Help with shop skirt/drip board

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Old 01-03-21, 03:59 PM
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Help with shop skirt/drip board

I built myself a shop and didn't bring the siding down over the subfloor. Siding is T-111. It terminates at the bottom plate. I've attached some pictures so you can see the issue, and what I've done to correct it. I took a 1x3 and ripped the back side to create a drip board. I then attached it using sidewinder on the backs and to seal the top joint.

The problem is what I did to correct will only last so long, and in a few places I still get a bit of damp plates/floor. I think this is at the t-111 panel joints. I need to add some caulking up the wall vertically a bit.

I have water intrusion at a roll up door and the floor has rotted out. This summer I will be addressing that and thought I'd possible address the exposed sub floor.

I'm considering z-flashing it but I can't help but think there is another way. I would like to avoid the z-flash if possible. On one side of my shop I don't have much working room, and I'm not even sure if I could get the z-flash in.

My question to you guys is - why not use bondo to seal that up nice and tight? I could float it out to cover the lower edge of the t-111 as well. Seems so simple and I can't see why it wouldn't work.

Thoughts on the bondo angle?



 
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Old 01-03-21, 04:10 PM
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I think flashing is the correct thing to do. It should have been behind the siding all the way around.

 
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Old 01-03-21, 04:56 PM
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Thx. It's absolutely the best and correct way to do it.


Im asking about an alternative though. There's usually more than one way to skin a cat.

​​​​​​I thought bondo would be a great alternative, but wanted to confirm my hunch with others real world results.

Water sure does find its way most other thing don't.

 
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Old 01-03-21, 04:59 PM
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Bondo will last a little longer than duct tape, yes.
 
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Old 01-03-21, 05:08 PM
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Thx.

I use bondo daily in my bathtub refinishing business. It works and it lasts. And, it doesn't leak.

 
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Old 01-03-21, 05:27 PM
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A bathtub (or a car body) isn't made of wood. Bondo is typically a short term repair when used OUTSIDE on wood, because if wood continues to get wet from behind, the bondo won't stick forever. Up to you if you want to use it or not. Might last a few years. Its only as good as what its sticking to.

I occasionally use it when repairing rotten window sills and trim. It lasts a while. But its not a permanent solution.
 
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Old 01-03-21, 05:35 PM
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Thx. Great things to consider. Exactly what I was looking for.
 
 

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