Wood patio on concrete


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Old 05-03-22, 05:31 PM
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Wood patio on concrete

I'm looking at my patio and I'm trying to fix it. Currently the way it's set up is not good. Basically all of the wood framing and siding are resting on the concrete in an area that gets wet whenever a storm comes through. This is causing the siding to rot because it was wood and so I'm taking it off and trying to find out what I can do to prevent the entire structure from falling apart due to rot. I am going to go around it with a metal strip of sheathing around the entire perimeter and I feel like I should use a PVC board to go on the outside of that throughout the parameter. My only question is what else could I do to prevent the water from getting underneath the board and still hitting that wood? It's not in an area that floods it's just an area that gets wet and I'm worried it's going to fall apart.
 
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Old 05-03-22, 06:30 PM
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Post a picture so we can see what your seeing.
 
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Old 05-03-22, 10:24 PM
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Pictures will help but the answer may be to remove it and pour a new one with the proper slope away from the house.
 
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Old 05-04-22, 06:57 AM
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Pardon the mess around my house


 
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Old 05-04-22, 08:19 AM
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The house is constructed too low to the ground. Normally you don't want any wood closer than 4-6" from the ground so it stays dry. In your situation you could make a horizontal cut in your siding 6" off the ground and remove the siding. Then slip galvanized steel flashing up underneath the sheeting/siding and attach to the house. This way you have flashing close to the ground.
 
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Old 05-05-22, 06:54 AM
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I can tell you the house is not too low to the ground you were looking at a patio. The house is the correct distance from the ground to the bottom of the siding. If you look carefully you will see that there is about a 6 to 8in difference between the house and the patio area.
 
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Old 05-05-22, 06:58 AM
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Just showing you that the house is high enough. Don't pay any mind to the color of the siding and that trim work. Going to be replacing it soon.


 
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Old 05-05-22, 09:05 AM
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Your question was about the patio portion of the house and why the wood siding is rotting. In your photo in post #4 you can see that the siding extends all the way down to the concrete patio. In the same photo you can also see the back side of your house the siding also extends all the way down and disappears into the grass.
 
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Old 05-05-22, 09:52 AM
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Let me explain it another way. The patio has the problem the house does not. I want to keep the patio but I want to ensure it doesn't fall apart. The patio was built years after the house. The patio concrete is significantly lower than the house. Does this satisfy the question or do you want a photo to prove that the house is higher?
 
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Old 05-05-22, 11:03 AM
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What you call "patio" and "house" doesn't matter. You have wood siding extending all the way down to the ground and concrete causing it to rot.

At the very minimum the bottom plate in your patio walls should be pressure treated, better if rated for ground contact though I doubt yours is. Because your "patio" is at grade the studs should also be pressure treated because of the close proximity to ground. As for the siding or sheeting I'd do galvanized steel for the first 6" or more so your wood siding is all at least 6" above the ground or concrete. See how the rest of your house has the concrete foundation at ground level and the wood parts of the house are well above grade.
 
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Old 05-05-22, 12:41 PM
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No need to get upset. I asked a simple question. All of the lover that was used for the framing is pressure treated. I didn't build this structure it was built by my father who passed away in 2017 I just didn't hear it to the house. So I'm trying to get everything in order so that it doesn't fall apart.
 
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Old 05-18-22, 11:22 AM
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So I am trying to envision the set up here.

You have slab under the patio. Sitting on top of that slab is pressured treated lumber that frames the floor and walls of the patio? You then have siding on the walls that lands on the slab. And its the siding and the wood frame you are concerned about rotting?

Is what I'm picturing correct?

Anytime you have wood near the ground (whether turf or slab) , there should be a gap between the base and the wood to allow air flow. Even if rain isn't getting underneath, there will still be moisture that sits there and rots the wood.

If the wood framing is elevated, then I would just look into re-siding the porch such that there is a 4-6" gap between the last piece of siding and the slab. I would then put hardware cloth or lattice over the gap to keep animals out. This will allow airflow that will keep it nice and dry underneath.

If the wood framing is on the slab, you should explore raising it. If you don't, it will eventually rot because, even if rain doesn't run underneath, there will always be moisture there due to it being ground level. Elevating it will allow air flow underneath, which will remove moisture.

I think that's really the only options. Trying to put piping or drainage around the perimeter can help but won't change the fact moisture is just sitting underneath.

Good luck.

PS: I bought a house with a ton of wood decking set at ground level. Eventually it will be redone properly but for now, its fun upkeep as I battle the rot.
 

Last edited by pbct2019; 05-18-22 at 12:49 PM.
 

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