pivot pin replacement

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Old 01-24-08, 03:24 PM
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pivot pin replacement

Has anyone out there replaced a pivot pin and bushing on a farm tractor?

The repair manual says to disconnect the radius arms and both axle extensions. That would leave the front of the tractor only supported by a bottle jack in the middle The pics in the manual show them replacing the pin with both wheels/axles in place

While I don't mind following the books instructions, I'm not adverse to doing it another way especially if it's easier or safer.

My tractor is a 1953 NAA ford - also called the golden jubilee
 
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Old 01-28-08, 09:48 AM
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update

What a job!! I liked to have never gotten the old pin out. I did remove both outer axles as the book indicated. It would have been nice to have had a helper and removing the radiator might have made the work easier if working solo.

Now that I know more about how the front end is constructed, I probably wouldn't have bothered to replace the pin and bushing. The pin was in good shape until I ruined it during removal. Only 1/3 of the bushing was there but I doubt my tractor is any safer with the new pin and bushing.... but maybe now it will outlive our supply of gasoline
 
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Old 02-02-08, 05:20 AM
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What kind of tractor were you working on? I have an old Ford 640 that I use around here, bushhogging, finish mower, all purpose, disc harrowing, or anything else the wife tells me to do. Sorry I missed your OP, not that I would have been any help.
 
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Old 02-02-08, 06:11 AM
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It's a 1953 ford golden jubilee [first year with the over head valve engine] known in the parts manuals as the NAA model. Ford's first tractor was built in 1903.
 
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Old 02-02-08, 03:38 PM
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Ah yes, the NAA. On my last cattle farm I drove a 1942 9N, every day. Had no brakes. I had the shoes in the barn to rivet on, but could never let it rest enough to tear it down. Converted it to a 12 volt system with alternator. Like the 1955 640 better. Live lift, but clutch pto.
 
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Old 02-02-08, 03:57 PM
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Is the 9N about the same as the famous 8N, except bigger?

I've always been fond of the flathead motors but I wouldn't want to work with a tractor that didn't have a 3 point hitch I don't remember how my pto works, only used it once with a borrowed post hole digger. Had to have an adapter to hook it up, I have the smaller spline.

I also converted my jubilee from the 6 volt positive ground to 12 negative ground. Now I never have to worry if I shut it down away from the barn
 
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Old 02-03-08, 08:16 AM
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No, the 9N was a predecessor to the 8N, oddly enough, considering the numerical notation. The distributor on the 9N is above the crank in front, and a royal PITA to work on, while the 8N moved it to the side of the short block. On the 9N the clutch and left brake were on the left side, while the right brake was on the right side. You never used your left brake, because you had to use your clutch, too. ON the 8N and forward, both brakes are on the same side (right), so you can spin the tractor in a field without using the steering wheel. I had to add the override adapter to my smaller spine, too. Best investment made, since the pto is clutch driven, if your clutch is out and you hit something with the bush hog, you will find yourself in another county before you can stop the tractor. With the override, it will free spin in the opposite direction. Keep it greased thoroughly, however. It lives on grease. Just love my old tractors. They do the job, and don't ask for any special treatment. Oil - Gas - Water. That's it.
 
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