Sand Texture, Then Paint.. HELP!!

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Old 10-25-04, 04:57 PM
Steffanie
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Question Sand Texture, Then Paint.. HELP!!

PLEASE HELP!! We're about to texture and paint the bathroom and I want to double-check before starting!!

We are about to put sand texture on the walls in the bathroom. This type of texture looks like curdled milk, is gritty, and says it will leave the wall white, with a "coarse sand texture." After the texture dries, we plan to paint it, but we want to use 2 different colors.

Here are my questions:

1) What is the best (most effective) way to apply this texture? With a roller? Trowel? Paint brush? We want the texture to have depth, but not be glopped up all over the wall.

2) We currently have an eggplant color and a sage color, but after reading another help thread on this forum, it appears that two COMPLETELY different colors will not produce a desirable result. Assuming we choose the purple.. Should we go with a dark purple base and a lighter purple wash? Or vice versa?

3) Where do I go from here? Apply the 1st color and let it dry then apply the diluted 2nd color? I'm SOO confused.. Apply both colors at the same time?

Thanks in advance to any and all who are able to help me..
 
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Old 10-26-04, 12:19 PM
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what is this texture stuff? is it thin like paint or thick stuff? there shouldn't be a choice between a brush or a trowel! what do the instructions say? and why are you using it in the first place? is it to hide cracks in your walls? because if you're only using it to increase the textural look on the walls, it's really not necessary if you're going to do a faux painting technique. and it might make the painting more difficult to work with. and if it's more like paint with sand in it, that won't give you "depth" anyway - just a rough, sandpaper-like feel.

what kind of faux painting technique are you planning on doing? sponging or rag rolling or what? whatever you decide on, practice it first somewhere else! i think you probaby CAN use 2 different colors successfully, but i think one needs to be light and the other dark, so you can use your deep plum color with the lighter, sagey green. if you've never done a faux painting technique, i personally highly recommend The Woolie. it's a paint roller that's been split into 2 smaller rollers on one handle. it comes with a split paint tray. you put one color on one side, and the other color on the other side, and roll them onto the wall at the same time, blending them together simultaneously. roll a little for a very blotchy look, or keep rolling more for a more blended, subtle look. if you blend too much, reload & blotch it up again. it's super easy and practically a no-brainer for beginners. mine came with a video, too. and on the box, they show several examples of the results of different color combos, one i seem to remember was a plum & sage combo - and it was gorgeous. if nothing else, find the product & look at the box! or go to their website. woolie.com i think. i used it in our bedroom & it came out great. and i don't think it would be enhanced at all by a sandy texture underneath. so you might save yourself the trouble of that step.
 
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Old 10-31-04, 01:33 AM
bamma
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While textured walls are fine, I personally do not like them in bathrooms or kitchens. Textued walls are harder to keep clean. You can do a dark glazing technique that will give your walls a beautiful texture look. Sage green or a light yellow look great with a raw umber glaze. Just sponge it on randomly while dry sponging it to soften it.
 
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Old 01-31-05, 10:26 AM
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We used a texured paint in our bathroom and we love it! (We don't have kids though!) I rolled on the first coat but applied the second coat with a wide brush using criss-cross strokes... It turned out beautifully! It is easy enough to wipe clean and any repairs are more easily disquised that with other painting techniques!
 
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Old 07-14-07, 03:32 PM
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sand finish paint

I expericed this at least 2 times. I was painting a ceiling that was in sand finish and i used a roller. As I rolled on the new paint, hunks of the old sand finish was comming off in my roller.
I quickly stopped and I had do the ceiling with a brush! Mabey the previous owner mades his own sand paint and the mixture was off. But be warned you may not be able to use a roller over sand finish when its time to repaint.
 
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Old 07-14-07, 03:47 PM
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Most sand texture, especially the older stuff is mixed with paint and rolled on the wall/ceiling. If the texture paint comes loose when repainting there are probably other issues which have caused the problem.

I suspect the reason you were able to brush it successfully and not with a roller is you applied less paint at a time with the brush which didn't wet and disolve the the underlying joint compound.
 
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Old 02-15-10, 11:32 AM
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Smile It all depends

The truth is that a sand like texture may be applied in many ways. Some use trowel (in plaster usually), others use sponges, brushes, rollers, etc. It is usually not applied with sprayers (unlike popcorn which is much different). It can be difficult, nearly impossible to match pre-existing in some cases.

Now, if you are re-painting you must be careful of the previous type of paint used. If the previous paint was very soluble, it will most likely be compromised when you paint over it which means your texture will be lifted into your brush, roller, etc. If this is a risk, then spraying (paint only) is recommend to re-paint. Otherwise, one pass, phone roller is usually best. It is also recommend to re-paint with sprayer as it will allow for a more even distribution of paint, as a roller approach will tend to de-amplify the texture.

In all cases, test when applying texture as it may take some time to perfect any desired style or effect.
 
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