Wall texture matching

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  #1  
Old 09-19-18, 08:22 PM
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Wall texture matching

Hello.

I had some water damage in my home, so I had to rip out portions of my wall and ceiling drywall. I've repaired the drywall, and now I need to paint. However, all of my home's walls are texturized. I know Home Depot has some "texturizer" in a can. Not sure if that will do the trick to match the patterns or not. Any feedback is appreciated.

I attached pictures of my wall texture and my ceiling texture. I also attempted to attach links to videos of each, to try to provide a better view of each texture.

Thanks!

Wall texture video link

Ceiling texture video link


Wall texture image 1

Wall texture image 2


Ceiling texture image 1
 
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  #2  
Old 09-19-18, 09:10 PM
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Yikes. That will be about impossible to match. The walls look like a thinned down joint compound that was painted on to the wall with a roller and 1/2" or 3/4" nap. The ceilings look more like a venetian plaster than joint compound... that was applied with a stomp bristle brush then lightly sanded flat after it dried.
 
  #3  
Old 09-20-18, 03:17 AM
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I've used the spray on textures with some post drywall repairs (electrical box moves) with pretty good luck but it's all about getting as close of a match with the nozzles as you can.

All you can do is get some, grab some big pieces of cardboard and experiment.

Be sure to feather the material over the repair area to get it to blend in!
 
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Old 09-20-18, 05:03 AM
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You'll never replicate that ceiling texture with spray texture, you might come close spraying the wall texture. I'd use thinned down joint compound and experiment with it until I was satisfied.
 
  #5  
Old 09-20-18, 08:11 AM
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Thanks for the responses! A few questions on the responses:

The walls look like a thinned down joint compound that was painted on to the wall with a roller and 1/2" or 3/4" nap.
I have THIS joint compound. How do you suggest I "water it down"? Is there a rule of thumb on parts compound vs parts water? Should I place it and mix it in a paint roller pan? Or, should I mix it in a separate bucket first since I have a decent amount of surface area to cover (~5 4x8 sheets worth).

Also, I'll try both 1/2" and 3/4" naps. I guess I just need to roll this on lightly and in a Y direction?
 
  #6  
Old 09-20-18, 08:18 AM
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I've always just eye balled the thinning for texture. Basically you thin it enough to get it in the neighbor hood of paint consistency. Don't mix the whole bucket to start with. If the mud is too thin [texture not heavy enough] add more j/c, if it's too thick - thin some more.

Not sure what you mean by a Y direction. You'd pretty much roll it like you would paint although you'll probably need to finish the rolling in the same direction [all up or all down] The mud can be rolled onto the ceiling but you'll need a texture brush to achieve the that texture ..... and maybe knock it down some with a drywall knife just before it dries.
 
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Old 09-20-18, 08:29 AM
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It looks to me like it was runny enough to sag on the wall a little after it was rolled on. Testing on a scrap of drywall is the best way to test. Buy a piece and practice. I would mix a little mud in a pan and keep thinning it and trying a sample. If it's too thick scrape it all off, thin it some more and try again. Once you get close let it dry as it will look a bit different once it's dry and it has shrunk back a little.

I have no suggestions for that ceiling. It's not the normal stipple or crows foot brush stomp... not the typical knockdown either.
 
  #8  
Old 09-29-18, 11:38 PM
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The lid looks like what we call a lace texture in stucco speak. This is very fine. Might also have some fine aggregate, I am guessing fine perlite. I think it was applied by a skilled plasterer and all I can tell you is experiment, experiment, experiment.
 
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