Who do I call to mark property lines?

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Old 05-12-04, 06:06 AM
PatrickG
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Question Who do I call to mark property lines?

I'm getting ready to build a wood privacy fence. Who do I need to call to come out and mark my property lines?
 
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Old 05-12-04, 06:44 AM
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A survey company would do that.
 
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Old 05-12-04, 07:28 AM
PatrickG
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Is this a necessary step before building a privacy fence? What's it going to cost me to have the lines marked? And will it cost me to have the utility company come out and check for underground service? When should I have them do it? I understand they mark the ground, but I donít want it to wash away before I get started Memorial Day weekend.
 
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Old 05-12-04, 08:05 AM
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Exclamation In Your Best Interests To Call USA

Hello: PatrickG

As a utility industry person, contact any one of the local utility companies and obtain the phone number of the USA sub companies.

USA stands for: Underground Service Alert.

The number is (or should be in your area) toll free.

Markings is done free of costs to the property owner.
(At least it is where I am aware of.)

Once USA is notified, USA in turn notifies ALL utilities in the area.

Once the utilities are notified by USA, if they have services in the area of the work to be done, they send out company personal to mark the locations of their prospective services for you, in advance of the starting of the work.

Notification on your part should be no less than 3 days prior to the start of the work. 2 weeks may be ideal for USA. Based upon work loads at USA and those of the utilities in the area.

Be aware, most fencing contractors I am aware of do not call USA. There assumption is digging a post hole is not likely to be deep enough to come into contact with any utilities.

Such is not always the case. That's a fact.

Services are damaged by post hole diggers as well as hand digging.

If USA is not notified and or the services in the area are damaged, the homeowner is usually responsible (in most cases) for the costs of repairs.

Protect yourself. Call USA.

Even if the contractor does so or claims to have done so or claims doing so is not needed. An ounce of protection is worth the time. If any service is damaged, usually but not always the property owner is not held liable....
 
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Old 05-12-04, 08:45 AM
PatrickG
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I'm going to be doing the install myself, along with a few helpers. What's the best way to measure to see how much fence I will need? Will the surveyor do this?
 
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Old 05-12-04, 10:01 AM
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Hello: Patrick

I was refering to and answering specifically these questions, only because I have some knowledge and experiences on how the notification is done.
What's it going to cost me to have the lines marked? And will it cost me to have the utility company come out and check for underground service? When should I have them do it? I understand they mark the ground, but I donít want it to wash away before I get started Memorial Day weekend.
In referrence to the other questions you asked, I'm sure the resident moderator will be able to help you with them, as soon as possible.

Regards,
Sharp Advice
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Old 05-12-04, 10:13 AM
PatrickG
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Ok, great. Thanks, Sharp!
 
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Old 05-12-04, 12:35 PM
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PatrickG,

First, welcome to DoItYourself.com and the fence forum.

Second, as Sharp Advise suggested, have the area where you will building the fence 'USA'ed'. It's just as easy as it sounds -- call the '800' number a week or two before you start. They'll tell you how to proceed. (It won't wash away -- they use SPRAY PAINT for just that reason! But don't worry -- it's a kind that fades away in a month or two.)

Hiring a surveyor is a good idea, especially if the fence line is very far from existing structures, or runs over uneven ground. Get a copy of your plot plan from your local bldg. dept. or assessor's office. You could call a local surveor or two and get estimates as to the cost of the survey.

The plot plan will have your properties dimensions on all sides shown on it. That will tell you how many linear feet of fence you will need. I'm sure that there will be some areas that you won't be fencing. Then you can figure out your material list and take it (and a copy of the plot plan) to whoever you will be buying your fencing from. They can double check your material list and give you the price.

Feel free to keep replying to this post with any additional questions you might have. Use the "Reply" button, NOT the "Ask a New Question" button. This will keep everything in one thread, and will move this thread right back to the top, as well as notify me that you (or somebody) has added a post.
 
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Old 05-12-04, 02:43 PM
PatrickG
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Thanks for the great advice. Iím planning on putting in a 6í dog-ear wooden privacy fence. A few more questions:

1. So, the surveyor will mark my property lines for me, or no?
2. Nails or Screws?
3. Every post in concrete or just the corners?
4. Who do I call to find out how big/tall the fence can be?
5. Individual boards, or buy it in panels?
 
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Old 05-12-04, 03:43 PM
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#1. Yes. (And USA will mark the location of any utility lines that may be buried where you plan on digging.)

#2. I prefer screws.

#3. I use 1-7/8" or 2-3/8" metal posts and concrete every one of them in. Use Simpson PGT1.5 or PGT2's to attach the rails to the posts.

#4. Your local building dept. It varies from one locality to the next, but around here, any fence 6' or less in height can be wood, and doesn't require a permit. Anything over 6' requires a permit, has to be engineered, and can't be wood.

#5. Your call. Panels are faster, but will cost more than buying the individual components. Panels work fine if the ground is flat, but adjusting for slopes pretty much requires that you stick build the fence.
 
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Old 05-12-04, 09:35 PM
millertime
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Originally Posted by lefty
#1. Yes. (And USA will mark the location of any utility lines that may be buried where you plan on digging.)

#2. I prefer screws.

#3. I use 1-7/8" or 2-3/8" metal posts and concrete every one of them in. Use Simpson PGT1.5 or PGT2's to attach the rails to the posts.

#4. Your local building dept. It varies from one locality to the next, but around here, any fence 6' or less in height can be wood, and doesn't require a permit. Anything over 6' requires a permit, has to be engineered, and can't be wood.

#5. Your call. Panels are faster, but will cost more than buying the individual components. Panels work fine if the ground is flat, but adjusting for slopes pretty much requires that you stick build the fence.


also of note on #4, if the fence is a meter inside the property line, in some municipalities you are allowed a taller fence.
 
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Old 05-13-04, 06:12 AM
PatrickG
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Ok, the surveyor said he could come out and mark the property lines, and that it would cost minimum $70. I'm supposed to fax him a copy of my deed. What exactly does he want?
 
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Old 05-13-04, 09:33 AM
Zezzica
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My husband and I are looking into installing a chain link fence in our back yard but wanted to know the steps before we could even think of starting...this thread helps with that...

Found this link for USA as Sharp had suggested.

http://www.usanorth.org/HTML/howto.htm

Good luck!
 
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Old 05-13-04, 06:36 PM
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PatrickG,

Your deed has the LEGAL DESCRIPTION of your property -- THAT'S what the surveyor needs.

Zezzica,

Take advantage of the service that USA offers. It's free. You just need to call them a couple of weeks notice before you start digging, and you'll have to mark out the area that WHERE you'll be digging. Small price to pay for avoiding cutting into an electric, gas, sewer, or other utility line!!
 
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Old 05-13-04, 06:53 PM
PatrickG
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Where do I obtain my deed?
 
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Old 05-13-04, 08:40 PM
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Your assessor's office will have the legal description of your property. That big old stack of papers that you got from the title company when you bought your house will contain a copy of the deed as well as the legal description of the property.
 
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Old 05-15-04, 12:23 PM
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Fence

Don't forget to check with your local Building Code office re: permits, restrictions, placement of fence along property lines.
 
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