retaining wall

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-28-04, 09:13 AM
stevenardigo
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
retaining wall

Im in the process of building a retaining wall about 3 feet high. I am using posts and also intend to use 4x6s as the cross members (which will be staked). 2 questions....
1. two of the posts are not aligned (about 1/2-1 inch off) with the others. Any suggestions????? Should I put in shims??? or just leave it?
2. should I stagger the cross members or have the ends of two cross members meet directly behind the posts????

Any help wold be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-29-04, 10:33 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The LAST thing I would build a retaining wall out of is wood! What are you thinkin'?? Earth to wood contact is going to rot the wood, and in 5 years (10 years max.), you are going to be redoing the wall.

Use the large garden wall blocks. They are concrete. They CAN'T rot. Your grandkids will be admiring your handy work.
 
  #3  
Old 07-29-04, 11:25 PM
millertime
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally Posted by lefty
The LAST thing I would build a retaining wall out of is wood! What are you thinkin'?? Earth to wood contact is going to rot the wood, and in 5 years (10 years max.), you are going to be redoing the wall.

Use the large garden wall blocks. They are concrete. They CAN'T rot. Your grandkids will be admiring your handy work.

if you use treated wood, the wall will last for decades.
 
  #4  
Old 08-02-04, 05:18 PM
stevenardigo
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thank you millertime for your response.

LEFTY------I do not appreciate the way you criticized my project. Instead of giving advice as requested, you simply told me I was doing it wrong. Who do you think are????? As a moderator you should be held to a higher standard. This website is supposed to be about helping each other out, not criticizing. You think I don't know the consequences of building a wall from wood. Wood can last for decades if it is planned for properly. Next time some one askes you a question and you dont want to answer it, just keep your mouth shut!!!!!!!
 
  #5  
Old 08-04-04, 09:13 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Millertime --

With the old CCA PT, using a .60, yes, you could expect the PT to last for quite a while in direct earth contact. "Decades" -- well, yes -- one or two. But I have dug the stuff out and KNOW what it looks like after 20 years of sitting there. Looks great on the outside, but the part in contact with soil is trash.

stevenardigo -- Nobody knows what the new ACQ PT is going to have for a life in direct earth contact, but I'm betting it won't be nearly what the old CCA PT was. A 3' high retaining wall is going to have a lot of pressure on it. You want it to last forever. Plain and simple I wouldn't do it in wood. No matter WHAT you use for wood, it's GOING to fail, sooner or later.

"As a moderator you should be held to a higher standard". Hey -- if you want to build the wall with wood, go for it. But I don't want your grandkid posting back complaining to my grandkid that "It failed, now what do I do??"
 
  #6  
Old 08-09-04, 10:36 PM
millertime
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally Posted by lefty
Millertime --

With the old CCA PT, using a .60, yes, you could expect the PT to last for quite a while in direct earth contact. "Decades" -- well, yes -- one or two. But I have dug the stuff out and KNOW what it looks like after 20 years of sitting there. Looks great on the outside, but the part in contact with soil is trash.

stevenardigo -- Nobody knows what the new ACQ PT is going to have for a life in direct earth contact, but I'm betting it won't be nearly what the old CCA PT was. A 3' high retaining wall is going to have a lot of pressure on it. You want it to last forever. Plain and simple I wouldn't do it in wood. No matter WHAT you use for wood, it's GOING to fail, sooner or later.

"As a moderator you should be held to a higher standard". Hey -- if you want to build the wall with wood, go for it. But I don't want your grandkid posting back complaining to my grandkid that "It failed, now what do I do??"

nothing lasts forever.
 
  #7  
Old 08-10-04, 06:11 PM
Kongar123456
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Stone lasts pretty long.
 
  #8  
Old 08-10-04, 09:12 PM
millertime
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally Posted by Kongar123456
Stone lasts pretty long.

yes, it does. but the wall it self doesn't last as long as stone.

dry walls will shift. wet walls will crack.



There is nothing wrong with using pressure treated wood for retaining walls. Professionals builders and carpenters do it all the time.
 
  #9  
Old 08-10-04, 09:44 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Millertime,

You are absolutely correct -- "Nothing lasts forever".

Yes, there is nothing wrong with using the old .60 CCA P.T. for a retaining wall. Hey, the old guys used it for house foundations and those houses are still standing, on their original foundations. (Problem is -- you can't get it any more!!) I'm just a little leary of this new ACQ P.T., and how long it might last in direct earth contact.

You are further right. "Dry walls shift" and "wet walls crack".

I'm just taking my chances with the dry wall made with keystone blocks. At least WHEN it shifts, I can fix it pretty simply.
 
  #10  
Old 08-10-04, 10:20 PM
millertime
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally Posted by lefty
Millertime,

You are absolutely correct -- "Nothing lasts forever".

Yes, there is nothing wrong with using the old .60 CCA P.T. for a retaining wall. Hey, the old guys used it for house foundations and those houses are still standing, on their original foundations. (Problem is -- you can't get it any more!!) I'm just a little leary of this new ACQ P.T., and how long it might last in direct earth contact.

You are further right. "Dry walls shift" and "wet walls crack".

I'm just taking my chances with the dry wall made with keystone blocks. At least WHEN it shifts, I can fix it pretty simply.
the "new stuff" has been used for 15 years in other parts of the world. The treatings are just different now, not everything is rated for ground contact because its more expensive. You have to specify ground contact.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: