gate post, 2 3/8 metal or 6x6? Lefty...


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Old 04-16-06, 06:36 AM
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gate post, 2 3/8 metal or 6x6? Lefty...

I am using 2 3/8 metal posts for my 6ft high dog ear PT fence, 8ft on center. I have installed one 4 ft wide gate using a metal post but I am not sure that it will hold up as long since there seems to be some "flex" with the metal pole even when going 33" down and 3 bags or concrete. THe post seems to have some flex in itself and not the hole in the ground. Should I use a 6x6 PT wood post instead? I will be adding a 10ft wide drive gate (2, 5ft sections) and I am trying to decide on which one. I read that someone else was using another metal post about 16 inches away from the gate post and let the 2*4 rail tie them together for more support? I wondering if the 5ft gate will be too much for one 2 3/8 post? I am also adding a 36" gate but I dont think that will be a problem for the metal post
 
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Old 04-16-06, 10:01 AM
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Adding a post a couple of feet away from the gate post and using 2X4 rails that attach to at least 3 posts, or even 4 (16' or 20' rails will do that), and either thru-bolting the rails to the posts or using PGT's will (or at least should) eliminate virtually all of the flex. If the gate is heavy, consider a 3rd rail, or install a cable with a turnbuckle from the top of the gate post to the bottom of a post about 6' or 8' away. Using metal gate frames will help as well -- they are lighter than wood ones, as well as being stronger.
 
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Old 04-16-06, 07:33 PM
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HD posts

Originally Posted by lefty
Adding a post a couple of feet away from the gate post and using 2X4 rails that attach to at least 3 posts, or even 4 (16' or 20' rails will do that), and either thru-bolting the rails to the posts or using PGT's will (or at least should) eliminate virtually all of the flex. If the gate is heavy, consider a 3rd rail, or install a cable with a turnbuckle from the top of the gate post to the bottom of a post about 6' or 8' away. Using metal gate frames will help as well -- they are lighter than wood ones, as well as being stronger.

I am using PGT and I am having the 3 rails connect to 2 posts + the gate post. On the gate post I am using a 2*6 vertially with PGT;s to mimic a 6*6 which allows me to using wood gate hardware. I tie the rails in with some 2* fence brackets that simpson makes. I use the simpson lag bolts. I was concerned because when the gate is opened half way the post does flex, but when closed or fully opened is fine (I guess like you said the 2*4 rails give the strength). Hoping it is enough for the 5 ft gates. I am using posts from HD which are 16 gauge. I am going to see if anyone sells posts around here (raleigh, NC) that are a lower gauge.
 
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Old 04-16-06, 09:42 PM
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If the diaphragm alone isn't working change the bending moment of the post.

1. INCREASE the wall thickness - Sch 40
2. CHANGE THE SHAPE & WALL THICKNESS - SQUARE.
3. Use higher strength steel.
4. MAKE DO - Beat tightfitting 1/4" flat steel stock down the post. [direction of tension & compression]. Fill with concrete. This accommodates small overloads only (as in your case). It's not smart planning.
 
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Old 04-17-06, 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by 2000
If the diaphragm alone isn't working change the bending moment of the post.

1. INCREASE the wall thickness - Sch 40
2. CHANGE THE SHAPE & WALL THICKNESS - SQUARE.
3. Use higher strength steel.
4. MAKE DO - Beat tightfitting 1/4" flat steel stock down the post. [direction of tension & compression]. Fill with concrete. This accommodates small overloads only (as in your case). It's not smart planning.

does anyone think that filling the post itself with some standard setting cement would work or would it just crack instead because of the small id of the pipe? I am still looking for a fence co. that will sell and not install fence parts.
 
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Old 04-17-06, 05:15 PM
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Filling the post will work IF you do it when you set the post, and slip a stick of #4 (1/2") rebar in it at the same time. Filling it 'after the fact' will create a cold joint, so the fill won't help all that much. Adding that to the other things I suggested certainly can't hurt tho!!
 
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Old 04-17-06, 07:57 PM
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Originally Posted by lefty
Filling the post will work IF you do it when you set the post, and slip a stick of #4 (1/2") rebar in it at the same time. Filling it 'after the fact' will create a cold joint, so the fill won't help all that much. Adding that to the other things I suggested certainly can't hurt tho!!

Will do... but what is a "cold joint". I am using fast set cement and thought to still use that (been working well) but use reg. cement to fill post so I have a chance to get it in the post. I have been putting the post in the hole and filling around it with fast set so I dont understand how filling after would be a problem.
 
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Old 04-18-06, 06:42 AM
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If you are setting the post in the footing then filling it immediately, you are fine. But if you are filling it after the footing has set up, the you have a 'cold joint' in the concrete, which isn't going to be very strong. Filling the post will help keep it from flexing, but you would need to tie it back to at least one other post as well (as described earlier) to add support to the 'cold joint'.
 
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Old 04-18-06, 07:30 AM
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Originally Posted by lefty
If you are setting the post in the footing then filling it immediately, you are fine. But if you are filling it after the footing has set up, the you have a 'cold joint' in the concrete, which isn't going to be very strong. Filling the post will help keep it from flexing, but you would need to tie it back to at least one other post as well (as described earlier) to add support to the 'cold joint'.
I have planned to have a gate post (5ft gate section) down 32", use quickset crete filling to the top about 2 1/2 50lb bags of crete (I am making the hole about 8 " square and "belled" at the bottom), , filling the post also with crete and rebar, and tieing into another post with 3, 2*4 rails that is 3 ft away and then another that is also 3 ft away. Using heavy duty hardware on everything including PGTs on all of them.
 
 

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