Build fence over a rock creek


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Old 03-07-08, 08:17 AM
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Build fence over a rock creek

Neighbor's yard is higher than mine and their water runs to my yard causing lots of problems. Water has erroded under the pool deck and now have to replace pool deck. I want to build a culvert/rock creek to move the water to the drain at the back of the pool, but the culvert will have to run along the property line. Current wood fence is being held up by vines due to water rotting the fence posts. Want to build culvert or preferrerably a rock creek along the edge and then build a fence there. Water will have to be able to get under the fence, so need the fence to run down the creek. Could wind the rock creek around fence posts? Need suggestions on how to build this.
 
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Old 03-07-08, 09:03 AM
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As you have discovered water is not a friend to wood.

It sounds like you have a lot of work ahead of you and I don't envy the task ahead. Have you considered using some sort of composite fence post. I honestly don't know is it is available, but I know that you can get a composite "sleeve"
similar to Trex that goes over an standard 4x4 or 6x6. I'll bet with a little engineering and a good sealant, that you could prevent water from penetrating the wood interior at the bottom, and it certainly shouldn't penetate from the side. This might be a simple solution to a complex problem.

Composite materials claim that they are not subject to rot. I don't know how valid the claim is but it seems plausable.

At any rate, I hope this answer sparks input from more knowledgeable folks who may have a better idea or can guide you appropriately. Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 03-07-08, 10:31 AM
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Fence Posts

This sounds like a good place to try a 4x4 vinyl sleeve filled with concrete. This would require planning ahead on how to fasten the fence to the posts.
 
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Old 03-07-08, 01:19 PM
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See, I knew some on would have a good idea. Of course the alternative might now be to pour concrete below ground level
and use the standard wood 4x4 or 6x6 above ground so that
fastening to the post would not be a problem. Presumably water would not wick up to the wood to cause any rot.

By golly, it sounds like a plan.
 
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Old 03-07-08, 01:32 PM
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the sleeves that I found are 5x5, so I would fill this up with concrete and secure under ground by 1/3 the height of the pole in conrete. How would you go about securing wooden cross boards to it? I would have to go look at it and see how to do that.
 
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Old 03-07-08, 01:37 PM
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One thing about the vinyl sleeve is that it is white and your fence will have to be painted to match it. I am not sure this is the right thing.
This house is in a tight neighborhood with homeowners on all sides and I will have to be careful to have a neat fence with no variations from code. Back to how to do this.
 
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Old 03-07-08, 02:31 PM
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Another option - since the rock creek is kinda useless land - is move the fence over. Be generous, the neighbours shouldn't complain. This doesn't change the property line. If the neighbours want to paint their side of the rock creek orange, that's their business.

Personally I rather a retaining wall and perforated drain pipe in your situation (neighbours yard higher), with fenceposts in brackets cast into that wall. Everybody gains usable land that way.
 
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Old 03-07-08, 02:34 PM
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I think what I want to know is how do you cast a fence post into a wall. The water comes too fast to do much else but a culvert or creek. Too much debris from trees also causes any kind of drain pipe that the water has to seep into to fail.

How do you do the cast in wall post.
 
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Old 03-07-08, 02:41 PM
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A 4x4 actually measures 3 1/2 x 3 1/2 , a 6x6 acutally measures 5 1/2 x 5 1/2. If you measure the inside on that
white sleeve that you saw, it is probably one or the other.
Those sleeves are designed to house standard lumber sizes.
Ask the lumber yard associate to ahow you.

Regardless of whether you seat the post into concrete or not, if the "concrete" inside the sleeve is below ground, AND the lumber inside the sleeve is above ground level there is little chance for rot. The lumber inside the sleeve will give you something solid to attach your wooden cross boards to.

If you are concerned about the white, some brands are available in a taupe (wood like) finish. If you can't find the wood color, then you could always cover the sleeve on all four sides with whatever kind of wood you use for your cross boards.

Keeping the "skin" above ground level slightly will help to prevent the wood from comming in contact with water.Even if the wood used for the post may rot in time, it could easily be replaced at a later date. The actual post would reman in good condition.

You could awways disguise, the bottom of the post with
foilage or even your rock creek. Good Luck
 
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Old 03-07-08, 03:13 PM
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So could I bury 3' of the vinyl sleeve in the ground, pour concrete in the sleeve, let the sleeve come out of the ground 6" and then place the 4x4 on top of the concrete/sleeve and build a fence?

should I bury 3' feet of the post with sleeve around it and concrete on the outside and then trim the sleeve to expose 6" above ground?

sp
 
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Old 03-07-08, 03:18 PM
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Put up a vinyl fence and create the drainage around that.

Start by doing the trench for the drainage, install the fence in the trench and rock the trench to prevent erosion.

Water isn't going to bother the vinyl fence posts -- THEY'RE PLASTIC!!

The fence doesn't have to be white. I've got almost 100' of it in my yard and the only thing that's white is the lattice panels in the top 18" or so of the 2 front gates. Everything else is done in tan colors -- peachy tan, cedarcrest, ...
 
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Old 03-07-08, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by TNProjectgirl
How do you do the cast in wall post.
-Build most of concrete wall but don't fill in where post brackets will be embedded (about 6" deep).

-Affix post to bracket. There are different brackets. Some like a tall letter "H", others wrap around the post. Nice thing about this, is, you can easily replace the post later. Taller bracket = sturdier post.

-Set the post/bracket in the wall, with supports so it's dead plumb. Two of those supports may be the permanent crosspieces, cut to any arbitrary length you like. Perpendicular to the fence, you'll need some temporary lumber braces.

-Pour cement to finish the wall, and embed the bracket (not the post).

-Two days later, remove the braces and build panels.


The brackets look "serious" and "professional" so shouldn't get complaint.
 
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Old 03-07-08, 04:19 PM
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Thanks for the help. I will see if I can do this. thanks so much.
 
 

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