Attaching a Wooden Fence to a Chain link

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Old 08-25-08, 07:53 AM
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Attaching a Wooden Fence to a Chain link

I am fixing my Flood Damaged house in the Burbs of New Orleans. Copper Thief's have already Ripped out all my copper doing Thousands of Dollars of Damage. I am about to replace my Outside A/C Unit and I have heard of Those units being stolen. I have a Chain link fence around my back yard it has a 6 inch Cement Retainer Wall that the chain link is Embedded. I can't dig up the fence its Very Strong and could last for many years. My problem There is no House behind mine and there is no house next to mine so from the street my Unit is Visible and from the street behind & Side. I have no neighbors to watch out for my house so I want to put up a Wooden fence around my back yard to keep Thief's from seeing what's there to steal.

Is there a way to attach a Wooden Fence to a Already Standing Chain link fence. I know how to install a Wooden fence from the Ground up, but not how to Attach it to the Post to make strong. I know from the street behind my house it might look funny but id rather look a little different then have to replace my Unit.
 
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Old 08-25-08, 09:41 AM
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Bigdaddy ,

I have seen many makeshift jobs of where there were wood fences attached to pre-existing chain link fences. Most of these makeshifts have worked for years without much problems.

Ok , first off. determine the size of the steel posts supporting your chain link fencing.
Then purchase Tension bands to that size.
Purchase, 2" lag bolts.

Put the tension band on the post with the flatter side of the band facing the backrail of the section of wood fence.
Predrill through the tension band bolt hole,,, into the back rail of the fence.
Ratchet the lag bolt into the back rail.
After all that, you may want to add staples from the chain link wire into the back of the rails for added support.
At the same time you may want to use tie wire to wire through the spaces of the pickets, through and around the back rails of the wood fence, and through and around either the chain link itself or if possible, through and around the posts.

Make sure your sections are all in line with the last... if the posts are set every 8' on center, you would have lucked out... Seriously speaking, I doubt all the posts were set every 8 foot on center ... So you will have a hit and miss all along the fence line. That is where the staples play such and important role in holding your fence line up.The tie wire also plays an important role as I have always found the tie wire being one royal pain in the backside while removing the fence .

I hope that helps.
 
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Old 08-26-08, 06:12 AM
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Thanks so much - i will go to the Hardware store today and start gathering supplies. When finished i will see if i can post a picture or something.
 
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Old 08-27-08, 09:53 AM
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Have you considered vinyl privacy slats that slip into the chain link? This will give total privacy and they can look great too with nice color selections. DO a google search for these, I bought mine off the internet for a good price, and we installed 200 feet worth of fence in one day on a 4' chain link fence.
 
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Old 09-05-08, 12:33 AM
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Pvt Or Winged Slats

Using PVT or Winged slats in the chain link would not work very well in this situation. It seemed that part of the problem was the chain link fence being embedded into the cement retaining wall. Installing the slats would mean each and every slat would have to be cut to an exact length of the neighboring slat. This would have to be done to maintain a uniform look on top.
Yes, using a slat in a normal circumstance would be a fantastic way to get privacy in most any chain link fence, but when the wire is old, buried and bent up, using slats is a nightmare in the making.
 
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