lowe's/home depot vinyl fencing


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Old 06-04-09, 01:46 PM
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lowe's/home depot vinyl fencing

Hello, I have a question regarding the 8 foot section, preconstructed vinyl picket fencing that you find at Lows and HD. Specifically, the scalloped style (wavy pattern). My house is on a corner lot, with the garage behind the house facing the road that runs by the side of my house. I wish to run the fence from garage to that side road and along the side of my house just past the side door.

My question is, since these sections of fence only come in multiples of 8 feet, what do you do when the length of fence you need is not a multiple of 8 feet. Do you just cut the vinyl fence? What is the best way to maintain the scalloped pattern? Do you start at the front corners and when you are forced to cut, cut an equal amount off from both sides?

Thanks!
 
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Old 06-05-09, 01:56 AM
Join Date: May 2008
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Fun4stuff;

Your answer all depends on the type of topper you have on that PVC fence. If the top rail is a curved rail, meaning it is literally curved from the top of one post down to the middle of the section and then curved back up again, you would need to order a custom curved rail from the manufacturer in the size of the space between posts.
If the topper is a straight rail and it is only the pickets that are swooping down and then up again you need to cut back on the rails so that they still can be inserted to the posts , cut back on the pickets so that they fit between posts and cut back on the topper whatever it is to fit inside the frame it has.
If the topper is spindles, you need to remove all the spindles from the section. You need to find a new center point of the section. You need to maintain the original height of the pickets closest to the posts. You need to maintain the original height of the spindles in the center, and between the post and the center you have to create your own slope. Whatever it is on one side is exactly what you create on the other side of the section. This meaning you would be best to start from the middle cutting two pickets for each height until you make your way evenly towards the post.
Going back to the curved rail, , , If you have that, and you wish to give it a try to cut the rail back in the middle and cutting out the amount of material that you need removed,,, You can do that. But if you do that you would be changing the height of the relation between the center of the rail and the pickets, or the mid rail if there is one. If you can do it just for a few inches it may not be noticed, but I believe you would lose strength in the section as the top rail will become pliable in strong winds. If you still wish to go that route I would strongly suggest overlapping your cut to join one side to the other with some more strength. Make this a very clean job as that last cut section that is obviously sized less than the others will be a focal point for all to see .

Good Luck .
 
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Old 06-06-09, 08:50 AM
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thanks for the response. here is the type of fence i was talking about... it comes in 8 ft sections that do not come apart.
U.S. Fence & Yard at Lowe's: 3-1/2' x 8' Classic Gothic Scallop Vinyl Fence Panel
 
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Old 06-07-09, 09:09 AM
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fun4stuff;

I am so sorry.. I have no idea where I got the part about it being a 6' x 8' section of material...

Ok , better explaining now...

In your case , the material you have is a glued section. The pickets are glued to the face of the section as opposed to another style where the pickets are inserted through the top rail into the bottom rail. There being anchored punches giving resistance for the pickets to be pulled back up and out.

In your case you can go two ways. One is much easier than the other, and probably much cleaner of a job.

In the lesser of the two, you would need to remove the pickets from the face of that section and simply use the directions of my previous post in cutting the pickets down, from the bottom of the picket and then reataching them to the rail with an epoxy, hot melt glue. This is not the same type of glue that is used on pvc piping. You could attempt to use that glue, but more than likely it will not hold over time.

If the cut section is to only be 3 feet or less I would suggest cutting the last 2 sections rather than just the last one. For example, if you get to your corner and all you have is 3 feet from the last section to the corner I would go back one section so there is now 3 feet, plus the 8 feet ... thus cutting back 2 sections and making the last few sections more or less even compared to the rest of the fence line. This tactic will make the corner less visible being having short pieces .
If you like you could also miter the corner rather than to have a 90 degree turn. That too would look nice, sometimes even better than a 90 degree turn no matter what the conditions.

In regards to my second, maybe more expensive , but definitely easier way to go.... Go to a fence distributor.. purchase a mid rail, pickets, picket caps and bottom rail. Build your last section from scratch.
I say this is an easier option because when you go to pull that lowes section apart, there is a very good chance you will rip the pickets off with their still being attached to the plastic top or bottom rail. Thus leaving a huge chunk of plastic missing on the rail. I would say that for every 8 pickets you remove, there may be at least one that will not come off without the adjoining rail. If you can avoid buying one section from lowes, you could use that savings towards buying the other materials instead.
This option may slow you down a little because you are not as into it as I am, but for me this option would be a very fast alternate to the ripping and breaking idea.

Of course, maybe you can get your pickets off without breaking the rail off too... That being the case, measure, cut from the bottom and reinstall.
Lowes also sells the other material where the rails are routed. It may cost a little more per section, but in cases like a cut it is so worth the difference in cost.

Good luck.. and again, I apologize for not giving the correct response to the actual question the first time.

Greg~
 
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Old 06-08-09, 06:09 PM
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Don't be sorry! Thanks a lot. I appreciate the advice. I think I am going to try the second way.
 
 

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