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How long after pouring my concrete till I can hang my driveway gates?

How long after pouring my concrete till I can hang my driveway gates?


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Old 05-12-13, 02:07 PM
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Question How long after pouring my concrete till I can hang my driveway gates?

Hello, I'm looking for some knowledgeable advice on concrete curing times and hanging driveway gates.

The Project: Installing a 16' Dual Swing Iron Driveway Gate

Parts/Specs:
The gate posts I've received are approx. 4 inches square and will project about 5 1/2 feet above ground when completed. Each post will eventually hold an 8' section of the gate.

Progress:
I've dug the holes for the gate posts already (I made these approximately 13 inches X 18 inches X 3 1/2 feet deep, and have poured 7 inch concrete caps in the bottom of each).

I've set one of the gate posts up already, and have poured concrete around it (up to about 4 inches below ground level). I'm currently waiting for the concrete to cure (as of 5/12 it will have been 7 days since pouring)...my understanding is the concrete should have gained 2/3 of its strength by now, but I don't consider my sources to be the most reliable.

My question is: how long should I wait for the concrete to cure before hanging the first half of the gate?

Thanks!
 
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Old 05-12-13, 03:25 PM
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Will the gates roll on the driveway? If not, the weight of them doesn't affect the driveway. Full cure can be 28 days. Few people wait that long to park their cars.
 
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Old 05-12-13, 03:31 PM
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Pulpo...he doesn't mean the driveway...he means the concrete in the post holes.
 
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Old 05-12-13, 03:37 PM
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"...he means the concrete in the post holes."

Right! =]

But to answer the question added by Pulpo, the gates won't be rolling on the driveway (no tires). The gate posts support their full weight.
 
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Old 05-12-13, 04:04 PM
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Assuming steel posts as well? I hope they aren't wood....

Does the gate company offer any sort of wheel option? If the gates have any weight to them at all..they are probably going to sag over time. Might be worth getting the wheels now in case of issues.


As to your concrete question...I can't imagine you will gain anything by waiting much longer. You could always go ahead and install the gates, and after completion, leave them open with the unsupported end blocked up.
 
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Old 05-12-13, 04:39 PM
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Well, the posts are the same iron as the gate...I don't see a wheel option in the company's catalog. =[

If it's of any use in visualizing what I have, it's the 16 footer at the following url:

http://www.wholesalegateopener.com/M...gates16new.htm

The gates are certainly heavy, I've lifted them by myself in the process of moving them around and such but hanging them is really a 2 or 3 person job.
 
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Old 05-12-13, 04:46 PM
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Well...looks like the posts are certainly strong enough. A shame they eliminated the ball bearing adjustable hinges. That would really help alleviate the wear issue. I'm sure you could find or adapt some wheels if needed.

I'd say go for it and block the unsupported end if you feel like it.
 
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Old 05-12-13, 05:09 PM
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Gunguy45 - Actually, my version has the ball bearing hinges - must've been before the hardware change.

When you say there could be sag-related issues, is that an inherent feature with this type of gate in your experience, or is it because I made the concrete feet too small? Just curious.

Glad to know that wheels can be added later if problems do arise.

Thanks a lot for your input, please continue to advise!

If anybody else has knowledge from having done this type of project before, please feel free to chime in!
 
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Old 05-12-13, 05:58 PM
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It's just very rare (in my experience) that the gates don't eventually sag somewhat. Not right away...and maybe not in 5yrs...but eventually. I mean...if there is a 4'x4'x4' monolithic block of concrete with the post in it...maybe not.


Here's a sort of example. I decided to convert a 2 1/2" metal gate post into a flag pole (since it was anchored into the footing for the block fence)...slid 2 lengths of IMC conduit into it (for a total height of about 12-15' above ground level) and made a bushing so it wouldn't rattle around, cross through bolted so no lifting.

3x5 flag at the top. Worked great for 2 yrs or so, no issues...then after an esp strong wind storm..it leans over at about a 10 degree angle. Who'd a thunk it? Heavy wall conduit fully supported and sunk into concrete 2 1/2' in the ground...??
 
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Old 05-13-13, 09:57 PM
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So far, so good! =]

On your advice, I hung the gate yesterday - no apparent problems with the concrete and the post appears to be staying pretty much plumb.

Once the entire gate is completed, there's going to be about a 1 inch space between the two halves of the gate. I wonder if adding a 1 inch section of steel bar just above the lock I want to put in would do anything to prevent eventual sagging? If that makes any sense.

In other words, by eliminating the side-to-side space into which the gates would sag.
 
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Old 05-14-13, 03:22 PM
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I would install temporary blocks in the top of the gate members, but if these gates are automatically opened, be sure to remove the blocks before operating them. The only thing I can suggest is do like we do on the farm and that is install bucks behind the gate posts, with cables run from the top gate side to the bottom away side of the buck to help maintain verticalness of the posts. May look odd with your set up however. It does work.
 
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Old 05-14-13, 09:26 PM
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Chandler - I'm not sure I'm picturing the right thing when you say temporary blocks, can you elaborate?

I'm thinking about either 1) adding some sort of heavy duty bracket or bolt(s) as a standoff between the top corners of the gate, or 2) putting spring-loaded gate casters on the bottom to support the weight from beneath.

Running cables outward from the tops of the gateposts won't work well for my project as I also have a pedestrian gate just to the side of the driveway gate. =[
 
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Old 05-15-13, 02:49 AM
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If you install a permanent block between the gates (welded to one gate), it will invariably cause closing problems. That is why there is a gap to begin with. Your gates will sag, no doubt. Even a little sag will cause problems at closure. I was thinking of the block until the concrete had time to fully cure. I like the spring loaded casters, due to the weight of the gate elements.
 
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Old 05-15-13, 05:54 PM
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Chandler - thanks for your input...that makes good sense.

I've found some spring-loaded casters I like, I'm thinking about the optimal way to mount them... If the sagging problem can be considered a certainty over time, then maybe I should mount them so there is some initial tension in the spring - effectively reducing the weight of the gates on the posts? (Rather than mounting them so that the gates must sag to create tension in the springs.)

What do you think?
 
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Old 05-15-13, 06:03 PM
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Yes, I would preload the springs, just not enough to lift them terribly. Good Point.
 
 

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