Chain Link Removal By Sidewalk


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Old 06-16-13, 06:42 PM
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Question Chain Link Removal By Sidewalk

Looking for suggestions and recommendations. I'm wanting to remove chain link fencing in my yard. The fence posts are placed in concrete and butted against a city sidewalk. Is it possible to use a post puller without damaging the sidewalk? The fence was installed after the sidewalk so there are 'seams' between the sidewalk and fence concrete which I believe would create a perforation, so to speak. Any input would be greatly appreciated!!
 
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Old 06-16-13, 06:54 PM
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Only one way to find out.
 
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Old 06-16-13, 10:36 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

which I believe would create a perforation
Possibly and possibly the fence post cement has bonded to the sidewalk.
You may have to use a chisel between the sidewalk and the post hole cement to break them apart.

Like Joe said..... only one way to find out.
 
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Old 06-17-13, 03:36 AM
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After you remove the wire and the top rail, pull on the top of the post, pulling inward toward the yard. See if a crack opens up between the sidewalk and the post.
 
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Old 06-17-13, 06:20 AM
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Removing that fence is not an easy job. I'm sure that you will need a jack hammer or at least a chipping gun. Dig behind one of the posts, just to take a look. You'll get an idea what you'll need.

That's a nice fence. Do you plan to replace it with PVC? Be careful in case a permit is needed. You don't want them to stop the job half way through.
 
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Old 06-17-13, 07:08 AM
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Why not cut them off as close to the concrete as possible. The new fence if wood or vinyl will cover the stumps. Plan B extend the sidewalk over the stumps.

Or why not use the existing posts for the new fence. If the posts need to be higher larger diameter posts could be slipped over the old ones. The only question would be the depth if you are replacing with a solid fence. Assumes encroaching on the sidewalk slightly wouldn't be a violation of city ordinance.
 
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Old 06-17-13, 07:49 AM
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Wow, thanks everyone for the quick replies.

We want to remove the fencing and place a small retaining wall to keep the yard from constantly eroding onto the sidewalk. I'm not sure if you can tell from the picture but the ground slopes heavily into the fence. We thought about cutting the posts but would like to keep as much of the material intact to try and sell what we can.

To put the retaining wall in we'll have to dig a trench so that'll be the time to look at the posts and see exactly whats going on. Thanks for the heads up with a permit, that was something that I didn't think about. I'll keep this thread updated as the project moves along.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 06-17-13, 09:32 AM
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<Opinion> Selling the chain link fabric, gates, and top tail makes sense but given the labor involved selling the posts doesn't. How much is anyone going to want to pay for posts with a big lump of concrete on the end? How much is your labor worth to remove it compared to the small amount of money received for the posts. Cut the posts off and sell for scrap iron. Heck, you might even cut them a foot high and incorporate them into the retaining wall as anchors. </opinion>
 

Last edited by ray2047; 06-17-13 at 12:07 PM. Reason: Spelling.
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Old 06-17-13, 10:13 AM
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It all goes back to what Joe said in post #2, and once you do a little digging, prodding, whatever, you may find that it's not that much of a chore. We had one recently that looked very similar to yours; a slab of concrete along the municipal sidewalk, and around the posts. Turned out that the slab was about 12" wide by 3-4" thick, and while the posts felt like they were set in concrete, they were each anchored with a pair of angles, forming an X a foot or so below ground. I had a backhoe on site for something else, so popped the concrete up and pulled the posts with that, but it could have just as well been done by popping the concrete up with a pry bar, digging beside the posts, cutting the bolts off the X's, and pulling the posts with a lever, fulcrum, and short chain.
 
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Old 06-17-13, 12:47 PM
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This is definitely an informative group of people and all responses have been great. This is the first project like this that I've planned and I'm more at ease starting it now. I look forward to learning and contributing more to these forums.
 
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Old 06-17-13, 01:42 PM
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Glad we could help. Please come back with anymore questions.
 
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Old 06-20-13, 08:24 AM
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As with any response, This job is very easy with the right tools.

Once the top rail and the wire are removed all you need to use is one of two different saws.

If you rent a Saw cut off hand held saw with a 12 inch diameter blade for cutting metal ... Probably will cost you about $60.00 or so per 4 hours and the job may be completed before 4 hours as long as the wire and top frame are removed before you rent the saw.

Once the posts are all that are exposed, all you need to do is use the saw to run your blade around the very bottom of the post. On a 45 degree angle, or so, pushing the blade into the bottom of the post and looking to cut the post mostly on the bottom, on the cement side of the post. Unless the cement completely surrounds the post. Even then all you need to do is cut 50% or better of the post.
Once cut then all you need do is bend the post away from the cut, back and then away again. After 2 or three bends the post will break away clean to the cut line.
This removal is very , very easy.

This removal process definitely calls for safeguards on your eyes and legs. Long sleeve shirts to prevent sparks from buring your legs, or definitely safety glasses to prevent sparks from hitting the eyes. But for sure once the safeguards are accomplished the task at hand will come with more ease and comfort.

This type of removal works whether you need to remove the fence from this type of application, up against the walkway or even if just needed to be removed from the ground. This is the way its done.
Its simple and easy. All you need to do is make sure you work safely.

SAFE WORK is the only way.

Best of Luck....
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 09-03-14 at 08:23 AM.
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Old 07-09-13, 05:15 PM
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Just an update on this project -

Thanks to everyone for the tips and advice. I was able to get the posts out without damaging the city's sidewalk. Luckily the concrete didn't adhere to the sidewalk, although some of it did create a 'lip' underneath the sidewalk, so to speak. I ended up doing it the old fashioned way - lots of digging, wiggling the posts, cussing, and pulling.

Now I'm on to putting up the retaining wall blocks. Hopefully it'll be done by this weekend. Thanks again everyone!
 
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Old 07-10-13, 07:06 AM
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Great Job...

I am happy it all worked out.... Best of luck with all your follow up projects.
And of course, feel free to drop in again with any other questions, fencing related or otherwise.
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 09-03-14 at 08:23 AM.
 

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