6x6x6 Wood Fence Construction


  #1  
Old 07-23-13, 12:10 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
6x6x6 Wood Fence Construction

I'm about to start construction on a 6x6 6' tall cedar privacy fence around our yard and looking at a couple of different options for the build process, specifically as it relates to setting the 6x6 posts.

I've done research on appropriate:
1) Width/Depth of the post holes (12" / 36" respectively)
2) Setting on a crushed gravel base
3) Concrete mix

I've also explored a 4th option of using an OZ-Post anchor. While there's much debate on it's practical use, especially with such a beefy 6"x6"x6' fence one thing occurred to me that I would like to vet whether or not it is a viable solution.

The design of this product is to eliminate (for the most part) the need the need to dig a 36" hole to set the post into. Instead, you secure the post into the anchor then you compact/drive it into the soil directly. The 36" anchor base "supposedly" acts as an extension of the timber and provides enough depth to secure firmly in place.

I'm personally not convinced the above would be sufficient anchoring for such a beefy fence, especially in Chicago where we are susceptible to fairly windy days and frost.

However, I was wondering if the following would work to compensate for "perceived" inadequacies. Bear in mind, I fully understand what I'm about to share defeats the purpose of using the OZ-Post but it does provide me with a different benefit if my theory proves to work.

So here are my thoughts:
Traditional approach for setting [6x6] posts entails
1) Dig a hole 12" wide x 36" deep
2) Add a couple of shovels of crushed gravel base
3) Set post in cavity
4) Back fill cavity with concrete mix
5) Use a rod to eliminate air pockets in concrete

What if I used the following approach instead:
1) Dig a hole 12" wide x 24" deep
2) Attach OZ-Post to [6x6] Cedar post and set into cavity driving it through soil
3) Back fill cavity with crushed gravel (instead of concrete mix)

Rationale:
Taking advantage of the OZ-Post anchor system and compensating for my "perceived" inadequacies by digging a hole and reinforcing the anchoring system with crushed gravel for added stability. It also lends itself to [more easily] replacing the post at a later date if necessary for whatever reason.

Putting cost aside, does the above mentioned seem to be a plausible alternative approach?

Thanks in advance for your assistance.
 
  #2  
Old 07-24-13, 05:32 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,388
Received 15 Votes on 13 Posts
Your area calls for 36" deep for a reason. That said, I would be wary of several things. One is that sinking cedar onto the ground will most likely result in a rotten post in fairly short order in relative terms as to fence longevity. Ground contact wood should be pressure treated. Second, those are huge posts and unless it is an aesthetic look that you are going for, it is way overkill for a six foot fence. I'm personally not sold on these post anchors for anything other than a mailbox post holder. I don't think they provide enough lateral support for a long heavy object. If you have ever installed a hand railing using standoff brackets you would understand my point. Six foot of material is being held by a couple of nails at the fulcrum end of a lever system. Not very sturdy without lateral support. Or in the case of a railing, a 90 degree corner or solid post to stabilize and attach to.
 
  #3  
Old 07-26-13, 10:38 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the response, it's really appreciated. The reason for going with 6x6 posts is purely aesthetics and to a degree peace of mind. Yes...it is definitely overkill, but the design of the fence would not be the same using smaller lumber. I actually agree with you in that I'm not sold on the post anchors, hence my theory of actually digging and placing them below the surface. But that aside, going back to your point on direct contact with the earth, it's a very valid point that eluded me.

Soo...let's assume I stick to traditional methods and just dig 36" to set my posts. Since coming into direct contact with the earth will result in much faster decay of the cedar posts, what if I were to wrap the bottom of the posts with products like:
1) Tyvek Straight Flash or Vycor [AND]
2) Vinyl post sleeve

Would the combination of the above mentioned products provide sufficient protection for the posts to enable the longevity of life otherwise expected?

Also, the perimeter of the yard is approximately 200 linear feet...just a big square/rectangle with approximately 30', 60' and 110' foot sections.

I'd be curious to hear your thoughts on whether or not a beefy fence like this would hold up.
 
  #4  
Old 07-26-13, 04:51 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,388
Received 15 Votes on 13 Posts
Some interesting reading from a previous post similar to yours.

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/fe...s-treated.html

I think wrapping will tend to hold moisture in rather than protect the wood from moisture. Same for a vinyl sleeve (if you can find a 6x6 sleeve). Water will find its way in. I think that cedar posts set on stand offs on my porch would be a wonderful thing. Used as fence posts in the ground is a risky investment.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: