Hold back soil from pushing over new fence

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Old 04-05-15, 12:25 PM
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Question Hold back soil from pushing over new fence

So across the back yard I want to replace 50í of existing fence. The problem Iím facing is my yard is about 8 to 10 inches higher than the back lane. Currently there are old railway ties laid down along the fence to hold back the soil. The problem is over the years the ties have pushed against the fence posts and now all the fence posts are leaning back a fair bit towards the alley.

I really want to prevent this from happening again and am hoping I can get some good ideas for holding the soil back in my yard without putting pressure on the new fence. Iím guessing some kind of short retaining wall but not really sure what is available or appropriate for something like this. Appreciate any ideas.
 
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Old 04-05-15, 12:53 PM
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some pics might be helpful - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html

Any type of retaining wall that just lays on top of the surface will be subject to movement in the freeze/thaw cycle. Would it be feasible to regrade and eliminate the drop off?
 
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Old 04-05-15, 03:25 PM
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Yes, it sounds like a retaining wall is what you need. You have a lot of options but a proper wall that will last 20 or 50 years will be more expensive than some used railroad ties so a lot will depend on your budget and how much labor you want to invest. In general though I would stay away from pre-cast concrete blocs from big box home centers. I consider most of them good for edging a flower bed but not proper retaining wall blocks.
 
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Old 04-05-15, 03:36 PM
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Old 04-05-15, 03:45 PM
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It looks like the posts are straight in the pictures but they really are not.

@marksr: I don't think it would be feasible to regrade and eliminate the drop off as the entire yard is elevated above the alley.

@Pilot Dane: I want to do this right, the existing fence is from previous owners and as a matter of fact I don't think it is even legal to use creosote ties anymore, I could be wrong but I don't want to use them any way. I'm just not 100% sure how to go about this.
 
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Old 04-06-15, 03:13 AM
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It shouldn't be an issue to regrade if you cover an area 3' wide. Basically change from a drop off to a gentle slope. If you stay with a short retaining wall it shouldn't be right up against the fence, there needs to be some space between the two although a concrete wall poured down to the frost line wouldn't need as much space.
 
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Old 04-07-15, 01:37 PM
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Well not 100% sure what I am going to do. I will get something worked out.
Appreciate the replies!
 
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