Replacing an exterior post on our front porch

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Old 05-23-20, 09:44 PM
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Replacing an exterior post on our front porch

Our house was built in the late 60's, and as far as we know the post in the pictures below is from the original construction. Regardless, it is rotting away at the bottom. In general, I'm wondering how much effort it will take to replace it. My biggest concern right now is determining if it is load-bearing. I'm inclined to suspect that it is bearing at least some of the weight of the trusses that extend over the porch. Not sure how to verify that though. Guessing I'd need to open up the soffit around it as a first step?
 
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05-24-20, 04:25 AM
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Hard to say if it's load bearing from those pics but that would be a good bet.
I'd erect a temporary support and then remove/replace the damaged post. A post bracket/spacer will hold the bottom of the post off of the concrete enough to help prevent a reoccurance of the rot.
 
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Old 05-24-20, 04:25 AM
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Hard to say if it's load bearing from those pics but that would be a good bet.
I'd erect a temporary support and then remove/replace the damaged post. A post bracket/spacer will hold the bottom of the post off of the concrete enough to help prevent a reoccurance of the rot.
 
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Old 05-24-20, 04:55 AM
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A piece of asphalt shingle also helps prevent rot.
Place it with the grit on the concrete.
Then once the post is installed trim off the excess.
 
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Old 05-24-20, 06:51 AM
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A picture from further away would help but even if load bearing it's not going to be significant that as noted a temp support will handle.

Check out Simpson post supports, a better way to get the post off the ground, many different types, some are even decorative, all depends on how the post will be finished!

https://www.google.com/shopping/prod...xoClOEQAvD_BwE
 
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Old 05-24-20, 06:58 AM
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Looks like you are in luck. The vinyl soffit around the post looks to be the last piece installed, so should remove easily. Remove the soffit piece and use a temporary jack post to raise the structure slightly. Replace the post and lower the weight of the structure onto the new post. Replace the soffit.
 
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Old 05-24-20, 08:14 AM
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I would also extend the horizontal part of the downspout away from the post/sidewalk.
 
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Old 05-24-20, 10:02 AM
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Thanks everyone! I appreciate all the advice! A follow-up question or two...

I've never worked with soffit before. Will I need a special tool to separate the pieces? (I'm assuming they're linked together in some fashion, somewhat similar to vinyl siding pieces?) Also, the soffit is metal (assuming aluminum), in case that's relevant.
 
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Old 05-24-20, 11:15 AM
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Soffit material just hooks together lightly, no tools needed!
 
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Old 05-24-20, 11:48 AM
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Do you have access to the same post style? If not and you want to preserve the look after you remove it you can cut off the bottom rot and replace it with good wood. If your in luck, the rot doesn't extend up farther than the square part of the post.
 
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Old 05-24-20, 03:55 PM
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Good idea, @Tumble! Unfortunately (for the work involved), we have no interest whatsoever in retaining the same style of post. My wife has been scouting around on Pinterest and has some neat ideas for changing up the style. Not sure yet when I'll be tackling this; hopefully sometime this summer. Have several other long-running projects that I'm spending most of my time on these days, and they still have a long ways to go. Might need to put one on pause to get this post issue resolved though sooner rather than later. Probably not too critical if it isn't load-bearing, but since I don't know for sure if it is, think it'd be best to play it safe and not put it off for too much longer.
 
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