Stain Wood Fence


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Old 08-12-20, 07:37 AM
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Stain Wood Fence

I am getting a wooden fence installed on the sides and backyard. I would like to pretreat it or stain the wood after it is put up. I am doing this to protect the wood against weather and make it last longer.

I have never done this before so I am looking at the best way to do it and the cost effective way as well. I am not sure what I need to stain the wood.

Do I spray or paint the fence? Perhaps it doesn't matter.

What type of wood staining product do I buy?

Thanks.
 
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Old 08-12-20, 07:44 AM
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What type of wood fence? stockade? shadowbox? Pressure treated wood? cedar? something else?
Often the most efficient way to paint a fence is spray and back roll but many are painted with just a brush and roller.
 
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Old 08-12-20, 08:21 AM
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As far as applying the stain I prefer roller and brush. A spray will tend to just sit on the surface. Roll it on then work it in with a brush.
I've use Thompson's water proofing stain. Flood's is another. All are typical and considered mid range quality. I found the Thompson's to hold up quite well for my application. I have all day intense sun beating on the fence and the color is holding up very well. However, the cross arms are not. They seem to have faded and need ne w stain. I think the type of wood is the makes all the difference.
 
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Old 08-12-20, 12:11 PM
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Just to clarify, any stain/paint that is sprayed onto wood should be back brushed/rolled to work the coating into the grain. That makes for a longer lasting and often better looking paint job.


Nothing wrong with brush and roll other than it takes longer.
 
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Old 08-13-20, 06:51 AM
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Thanks for the responses. I believe it is stockade fence. Most likely I will use a brush and roll it on. Does Home Depot carry Thompson brand?
 
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Old 02-17-21, 04:58 PM
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Not sure if Home Depot carries that particular brand... I've used their interior paints a lot (rather than exterior) so I've mostly gone with Benjamin Moore. Don't recall seeing anything there from Thompson. If you're going with stockade fence, you can probably use a roller for quick application. However, if your wood is grainy, you might want to use a heavy brush to work the coating in really well. If you're using stain, do a couple coats to properly seal it, and be careful not to leave big overlap strokes from your roller, that never looks good.
 
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Old 02-18-21, 05:49 PM
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Personally, I would not use anything from Thompson. Flood does make good products but just as with paints, better stain, staining products and advice will be found in a paint store than a paint department.
 
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Old 02-19-21, 08:04 AM
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I am doing this to protect the wood against weather and make it last longer.
In my opinion staining or panting a fence is purely for appearance. The several fences I have had (stockade, post-and-rail) and many of all types that I have seen usually fail below ground or at the rail connections where moisture gathers, seldom on the faces or pickets.

I let my cedar fences weather to a natural no-maintenance grey. Posts are pressure treated.

Painting or staining will require future maintenance to keep a fence looking good.
 
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Old 02-19-21, 11:02 AM
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In my opinion staining or panting a fence is purely for appearance. The several fences I have had (stockade, post-and-rail) and many of all types that I have seen usually fail below ground or at the rail connections where moisture gathers, seldom on the faces or pickets.
Depends on the neighborhood. But staining I think does help to a degree. But for looks, it really makes a difference. The natural gray looks bad after a few years in my opinion.
 
 

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