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Cheapest 400 foot fence that is economical and good looking?

Cheapest 400 foot fence that is economical and good looking?


  #1  
Old 01-29-21, 07:13 PM
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Cheapest 400 foot fence that is economical and good looking?

Hi,

As the subject says, I'd like to run 400 feet of the most affordable yet good looking fence at my property line on one side. What are my options and will this be hell to install without any knowledge?

I am sure that I can youtube this but looking for a starting point. This project can be done over days, weeks, months, etc.

The fence doesn't need to perform any function besides to separate property lines permanently without looking too tacky. Except for the fact that I would like the flexibility of putting wire mesh onto it eventually to keep my dogs in. Yes, I know that I would need 4 sides to keep my dogs in but I just want to focus on this 400 foot straight run for now.

FWIW, I had a survey done, I know what the setback requirements are in my state and I have stakes driven into the ground every 50 feet.

Thanks.
 

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01-30-21, 06:48 AM
Wirepuller38
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What are my options and will this be hell to install without any knowledge?
I suggest you do cost estimates for the various types of fencing. While doing the cost estimates, consider the ease of installation for each type. Also, determine what tools you will need. You may want to purchase some tools and rent others. Post back here with questions as you proceed. Good luck with your project.
 

Last edited by Wirepuller38; 01-30-21 at 06:49 AM. Reason: To correct spelling.
  #2  
Old 01-30-21, 02:14 AM
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Would your fence type be under any HOA or other restrictions?
What looks good can be very subjective. 2x4 fencing wire is probably the cheapest. Chain link becomes more affordable if you diy. Wood fences can look real nice but come at an increased cost.
 
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  #3  
Old 01-30-21, 03:53 AM
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Cheapest 400 foot fence that is economical and good looking?
The term cheap and good looking don't go together, need more definition. As noted chain link is relatively cheap and secure but not so attractive.

A privacy fence is attractive but not very cheap.

Want really cheap, snow fence, but again ugly as sin!
 
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  #4  
Old 01-30-21, 05:50 AM
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Thanks for all of this. Really informative posts and easy on the eyes. Your responses are a nice starting point without getting me overwhelmed.

So there is no HOA or other restrictions in place here. I know that cheap and good looking probably don't go together.

For starters, what is my cheapest wood option that would allow me to tack some wire type fence onto it at a later time?

What else did you want to know?

Thanks.

 
  #5  
Old 01-30-21, 06:17 AM
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If you are doing the install yourself you could probably put in 400' of PT split rail for around $2000. It depends on if it is appropriate for your location.
 
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  #6  
Old 01-30-21, 06:22 AM
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Something like this on the PT split rail? It is pretty rural here and this appears to be kind of what the neighbors have.

https://www.google.com/search?q=PT+s...cqfNDqu3UHZFaM
 
  #7  
Old 01-30-21, 06:48 AM
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What are my options and will this be hell to install without any knowledge?
I suggest you do cost estimates for the various types of fencing. While doing the cost estimates, consider the ease of installation for each type. Also, determine what tools you will need. You may want to purchase some tools and rent others. Post back here with questions as you proceed. Good luck with your project.
 
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Last edited by Wirepuller38; 01-30-21 at 06:49 AM. Reason: To correct spelling.
  #8  
Old 01-30-21, 07:37 AM
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I agree with CW, a split rail fence will afford you all the options you want. Looks good, and can be covered with a wire mesh, relatively cheap by comparison to other types.
 
  #9  
Old 01-30-21, 08:25 AM
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Alright Norm, are there multiple types of split rail fences? I posted a link to see if I am tracking correctly on what split rail fences actually look like.

I would post what my neighbors have but don't want that could reveal my location and I don't believe I can delete my post afterwards.

Thanks!!
 
  #10  
Old 01-30-21, 08:27 AM
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Do GOOGLE image search on Split Rail Fencing. All kinds of pictures.

 
  #11  
Old 01-30-21, 09:02 AM
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You could also check out sinking 4x4 posts and just nail on 2x6 treated lumber. It would be similar to split rail, just everything is face nailed. Google "board fencing" in images
 
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  #12  
Old 01-30-21, 09:37 AM
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This last fall I removed 200'+ of split rail that I installed more than 35 years ago. My wife and I installed that fence over a long weekend. I rented a power auger for the holes and we did them in one morning. The posts were made of black locust and the buried part of the post was still in perfect condition when I removed them. Over the 35 years I had to replace most of the rails though.

Shop around for materials, especially the rails. I think most posts available now are probably PT pine.
 
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  #13  
Old 01-30-21, 09:48 AM
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I am a strong fan of metal posts if they able to be incorporated (Ex: Z-Post). Drastically reduces the need for maintenance/replacement in the future. I've only used them for three fences but was able to hide the posts with a little thought. Cost-wise, they can be more expensive initially than some but near as I can tell they last forever.
 
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  #14  
Old 01-30-21, 09:54 AM
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If you just want a barrier, then "Australian Sheep Fencing" is easiest.
it is basically just a wooden post, which a somewhat flexible roll of vinyl tacked to it.
This is from a bike trail through Valley Forge National Park, it's a basic fence, just there to remind people to say on their side, and out of the forested areas.
You COULD go with a much smaller post, perhaps down to 3' x3' and still be able to hammer it in, BUT have it be substantial enough to be viewed as a fence.


 
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  #15  
Old 01-30-21, 03:59 PM
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Thanks everyone for the ideas. I really like Hal's idea in particular. I did a search in google images with the verbiage "Australian Sheep Fencing" but it didn't bring up anything that I noticed to be similar. Anyone know more about this type of fence?

Most of the idea is to just create a border and this is nice looking. Will the vinyl resist UV?

Thanks.
 
  #16  
Old 01-30-21, 05:11 PM
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Here is one I have seen similar to Hal's picture: https://www.rammfence.com/fence/flex...-660-foot-roll It is used as horse fencing.

It appears to have a 25-year warranty. Other options are available.

Also try googling "flex livestock fencing"
 
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  #17  
Old 01-30-21, 05:17 PM
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@Tolyn

Yeah that is what I have been looking at too but by the time I was all said and done, I am starting to think that might be as expensive or more expensive than going split rail. I could be wrong. That sure looks easier though.

As I began to poke around a bit more, I am starting to think he was referring to this...

If you zoom in a bit at his picture, it actually looks similar. Whaca think? "Batten Tape Fence" perhaps?

https://www.farmtek.com/farm/supplie...30_109622.html

Here is a variation of what you posted but even with 2 sets of rails I think the price will still be higher than split rail maybe?

https://www.ruralking.com/381058?gcl..._BwE#471=20895

I will go google flex livestock fencing.

 
  #18  
Old 01-30-21, 05:29 PM
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That looks pretty close as well. Better price than the Ramm fencing.

I have something very similar for your horse fencing but it is only 2" wide. That is made by Horse Guard if you want to check them out. All mine is attached to T posts which are not pretty but are very functional. Their brackets will attach to any type of post. Wood, Metal, other. I have two strands of tape and it is very nice and recommend it for my application. Your application may be different.

I just checked out a Menards fencing estimator and it says split rail fencing in either cader or PT cader-tone (Better in my opinion) is the same price at $1,757.47 for 400' Plus tax, delivery, etc. Just food for thought.

Ramm fencing would be $676 Plus tax, shipping, etc (2 runs)
FarmTek would be $408 Plus tax, shipping, etc (2 runs)
Treated posts $451 https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pr...t=posts%208%22
 
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Last edited by Tolyn Ironhand; 01-30-21 at 05:44 PM.
  #19  
Old 01-30-21, 06:03 PM
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Thanks again. It looks like my math might be flawed. The vinyl could still work out cheaper.

I appreciate you looking this up.
 
  #20  
Old 01-31-21, 05:30 PM
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Lumber Prices Triple?

Has anyone heard anything about lumber prices being triple what they normally are at the moment?

This might make me want to think twice about my next move.

Thanks.
 
  #21  
Old 01-31-21, 05:47 PM
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all lumber and building materials are in high demand since COVID and yes prices have gone up. At my store they raised prices on 2 x 4 by over $1.50 from pervious price.
 
  #22  
Old 01-31-21, 06:56 PM
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Gosh, this doesn't sound like triple but doesn't sound good either. Thanks for the post. This is all alot to take in,

I appreciate the posts.
 
  #23  
Old 02-01-21, 02:02 AM
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Locally most lumber prices have doubled, except for 7/16" OSB which has close to tripled.
 
  #24  
Old 02-01-21, 11:09 AM
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Since you're just looking for a decorative fence, and profile says Spotsylvania, I wonder if might check with local sawmills for odds & ends 2' x 4' which should be sufficient to support an essentially decorative fence.
If I Were You, if the rolls were 100' then I'd set a 4'x4' posts and tack on the vinyl, then set another post around 100 brace both posts with 45 degree 2' x 4' and tighten. Then cut 8' two-by-fours into stakes about 4' long and put a post at the 50' mark and hammer into the ground and tack the vinyl onto the post. (In my experience with fencing, you want to put posts in at the half-way point because if you work right-to-left you end up with a loose section at the end that has to be re-tensioned.
 
  #25  
Old 02-12-21, 06:14 PM
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HAL_S posts 14 and 24 seem to imply that the posts can be hammered into the ground somehow without setting concrete? Post 24 has enough information in it to confuse me but 14 in particular seems to indicate that the post can somehow be hammered into the ground?

Is that correct? Can anyone clarify?

Thanks.
 
  #26  
Old 02-12-21, 07:19 PM
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You don't have to set post in concrete. Depend on the soil conditions and the depth you plant the post and climate conditions. Think of it this way...They don't sink telephone poles in concrete. But they get buried nearly 1/3 of the length.
 
  #27  
Old 02-13-21, 07:02 AM
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Thanks for that. So the install questions start with some possible regression I am sure.

How do I attempt to drive the post into the ground? Is there a limit in wood diameter that will not permit being driven into the ground but rather split during my attempt? For example, there seems to be a mention of driving a 2x4 into the ground for starters. I'd assume that would be the smallest post that I'd attempt to drive into the ground?

What would the next step be if the ground does not permit me to drive the post into the ground?
 
  #28  
Old 02-13-21, 07:13 AM
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I don't mean to be a smart ass, but things like a shovel, post hole digger, sledge hammer. If the ground is so hard try soaking it first, then dig or pound in post. Sawing a point on the end of the post helps a lot.
What kind of ground conditions do you have?
 
  #29  
Old 02-13-21, 07:16 AM
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Nah, that is being smart ass. I am at a certain level just like you were at some point even if you had the fortune of being at that level at 5 years of age. I have expertise in different areas just not this one. Very few can be experts at everything even if the task at hand seems simplistic as say brushing your teeth in the morning. Forget about it if responses are going to become passive aggressive.
 
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Old 02-13-21, 07:32 AM
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My apologies.
Again that was not my intent. Just that the question seemed so...well basic. And yes I have over looked or was ignorant of very obvious or basic things and in many cases still am. Please don't take every thing so personal. We're (I'm) trying help you.
Maybe you can tell us what tools you have available, what ground conditions you have and what terrain you need to cover. You mentioned using 2 x 4's. Fine. Don't expect to pound in a 2x4 with a blunt end. Use a saw or an axe to point it. Maybe a starter hole would help if the ground is hard. Perhaps you might need concrete. Give us specifics and we will either say yea or nay.
 
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Old 02-13-21, 07:48 AM
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Let's start over.
You want a relatively decorative fence mainly to separate property lines. Correct? But you don't want it to look tacky. In my opinion using 2 x 4's is tacky unless you can make them look rustic in some form or manner. How high would like the fence to be? From previous post on this thread, the split rail style indicates about a two to three foot high is what you're looking for. I'm I correct?
 
  #32  
Old 02-13-21, 08:11 AM
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We can take our comments and perspectives to private messaging or not at all. I see that you posted twice while I was posting this so I am trying to generate a post that responds to most of this.

2x4(s) are a possibility only because they were mentioned below...but if there are easier wood choices to drive into the ground then I am all ears (I know that metal posts were mentioned below but I have refrained from that discussion to avoid crosstalk and possibly for cosmetic reasons as well).

I just have a shovel. I believe it is called a trenching shovel. I used that to dig trenches for electrical wiring years ago when I was more able bodied and had more time than money. Now that factor is about a draw so I am trying to weigh out paying someone or DIY. One thing I like about the DIY option is that it is on my property so there is no rush. Even if I pay someone, better knowing my stuff helps to ask intelligent questions I'd think.

I guess that tacky is subjective as mentioned in this thread. I found my last installed fence at another property to be tacky. It had those green metal posts with mesh wire in between. In some places it would look nice, but not in this location. NOTE: If I could do something similar with metal posts AND they are easier to install AND they look different than I am all ears. I just can't stand that green. All, don't be surprised if I start asking about wire and metal options soon. I am not sure that I am a fan of chain link fences just thought I'd mention that....but some variation of wire and say pretty metal posts (especially if they are easy to install) might be an attractive option.

As far as terrain goes, the land starts off low but generally and gradually slopes upwards I'd say that it is about 15 feet higher at the end.

I have never been good at determining soil hardness. Seems like over the years no matter what whenever I have shoveled into the ground anywhere around here it seems soft for a while (well relatively easy to dig) red clay and then about a foot down it seems to become rocky and hard to dig. I am not sure that it is like that every where here though. I would think that it is hard to make a generalization about the ground foot by foot or inch by inch. That is what worries me a bit.

To be candid, it's not so much about the height but about it being recognizable as a fence as HAL_S put it. What he linked to would be perfect perhaps with the same color scheme or even white with white vinyl.

However, I am a bit concerned about the nasty winds that come around here. There are no trees to break the winds when they come. I'd hate having egg all over my face (or even worse pieces of fence going into my neighbors yards) should a gust of wind come.

Thank you.
 

Last edited by jj94auto; 02-13-21 at 08:28 AM.
  #33  
Old 02-13-21, 08:31 AM
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Not sure what to tell you. Hal's suggestions seem like the easiest and likely the least expensive fencing. What you could do, is decide on the style, then try sinking in one or two post by yourself. If that seems to much work or you don't have the proper tools, then have that done by an outside person. Then you can string the actual fencing yourself as per Hal's suggested procedure.
You can't back a cake unless you break a few eggs (so the saying goes). Try it a see what happens. You'll learn real quick if it's the wrong decision.
 
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  #34  
Old 02-13-21, 08:32 AM
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For installing posts you are better off using a post hole digger than a shovel. In my area, the ground is mostly sand, with few rocks, so I can use an ice auger to drill holes. Not good for the blade but it is very fast. IMO I doubt it will be very easy to beat a wood post into the ground with some specialized equipment. Metal T posts, yes. But not wood posts. I would not go any smaller than 4x4 or 4" round wood posts.

At 400' you can expect to have to drill about 41 holes. (At 10' spacing) You could hire someone just to drill the holes. With the right equipment, it would likely take them a couple of hours tops. Setting the posts and backfilling is much easier than drilling the holes.
 
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  #35  
Old 02-13-21, 08:41 AM
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@Norm201 Nah, you got it right. I guess in a round about way I was asking whether or not there was a way to reduce trial and error or perhaps even ELIMINATE it. Your post answered that so thank you.

Now onto asking if I can ELIMINATE trial and error. Tolyn's post is pointing me into the direction of ways I can eliminate that. I have never heard your cake saying until now. I like it.

Trial and error just burns me out. I need a rest from it at times.

HAL_S methodology looks sound I am having difficulty comprehending it though. I might need to read it a few more times and ask questions.
 
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  #36  
Old 02-13-21, 08:52 AM
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@Tolyn....did you mean "without" specialized equipment. I just wanted to make sure that we were tracking there.

Your comments bring me in an interesting direction as well. Say I want a cool new tool? I love price shopping for tools and despise renting them since the rental places are relatively far away and there is no feeling like having that tool be broken and having to bring it back....it happens too often.

I like owning a new tool even if it just sits and is impractical and it costs me more than it would to pay someone to do the job (Within Reason). I am stubborn like that. Besides, what is impractical now may be practical for my kids one day. I am jealous of dudes my age who have had tools handed down from their ancestors. I have jack and it seems like everyone else had status qo good folks.

We are tracking on minimum post size.

Would you or anyone care to:

1) Let me know roughly what kind of post hole digger to consider? Are there different types?

Alternatively or in Lieu of that.....

2) What sort of machinery that I could reasonably purchase to own and dig my own post holes? I say reasonably but such an item could be out of scope for me e.g. more than a few hundred bucks on sale. (I don't do used tools).

Thank you.
 
  #37  
Old 02-13-21, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by jj94auto
HAL_S posts 14 and 24 seem to imply that the posts can be hammered into the ground somehow without setting concrete?
Yep. BUT, it really depends on your local soil. If you have "loam" or "sandy" soil you can hammer something as thin as a wooden broom handle 2 feet into the ground (as long as it's not frozen). If you're in heavy clay soil, then in spring when the soil is saturated and the clay is "workable" you can cut a point onto a 2x4 and drive it 2' into the ground without much of a problem.
Now, a modern 2x4 has shrunk to 3.5" x 1.5". So, if you cut 1" off the long end, the 2.5" x 1.5" timber will fit into a standard 3" diameter steel fence post driver.

The fence post driver is a steel tube, closed on one end and open on the other. You slide it up and over a post (steel or up to 3" wood) and then simply keep lifting and slamming the post drive down until the post is at the height you want.
 
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  #38  
Old 02-13-21, 10:00 AM
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Should add a post script-
It REALLY, REALLY depends on what your local soil is like.
First, my local municipality is "Rockhill" and it's accurate- top of the piedmont, in most areas anywhere you dig after 8-inches down you will hit a rock. More than 4-feet down and you're likely to hit bedrock.
In contrast, once you go below "the fall line" and into the areas where the rivers are tidal (or along the larger river valley bottoms) you can go 8-feet down before hitting rock, and perhaps 40-feet down before you hit bedrock.
Second, is soil TYPE. Sandy, loamy or peaty soils are easy to drive posts into. Rocky or dry clay, no chance. However, come spring, saturated WET clay will turn to turn to sticky maple-syrup consistency in the wrong conditions. When clay soil is saturated like that, it basically turns into playdough, and it flows and squishes easily.
"Mostly True" story- we had somebody get off the road and takeout a bunch of fence posts a few years ago. Some where sheared off at ground level, others were only split. Since I've replaced ALOT of fence posts over 4 decades, I knew to wait until the clay soil was saturated and pliable. When the clay soil is JUST RIGHT, you can take a fence post, and simply push & pull back and forth and the clay soil will flow. It's just a larger version of pushing a pencil into a ball of playdough. While I'm working the fence posts back and forth to widen the hole, my retired neighbor across the street is moving his 10 acre lawn, and looking at me like I'm crazy. Then, once the hole is widened into a cone, you can start to twist and then "roll" the fence post around to 90-degrees from where it was, and then the fence post is freed.
At that point, you can literally reach down and pull a split rail fence post out of the ground with one hand.
Best part, when my neighbor saw me going down the line of posts, pulling posts buried 3' deep out of the ground with one hand, he darn-near fell off his tractor.
 
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  #39  
Old 02-13-21, 10:10 AM
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@HAL_S for post #37

Thank you for this. I knew about this tool but just wanted to be sure. I was also reading about the need to wear a hard hat while using it as the post can come forward and knock you out. Doesn't sound like fun.
 
  #40  
Old 02-13-21, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by jj94auto
Let me know roughly what kind of post hole digger to consider?
All you really need is a ~$30 wooden post hole digger in loamy, sandy, or clay soils.

If you have a rocky soil, you will also need a digging bar.

I'd ACT NOW, because the 70" digging bar is showing up online as 98...
 
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