Dowels in horizontal fence


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Old 04-06-21, 08:07 AM
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Dowels in horizontal fence

I'm installing a horizontal fence of 5/4" 16' treated deck boards on eight foot centered posts, staggered. I'm wondering if anyone has used dowels inserted into the horizontals at the 4' mark between the posts to prevent warping and cupping, and if anyone can see a downside to doing that using hardwood dowels and gluing or caulking at least the bottom portion of the dowel in order to help prevent water from seeping into the dowel hole and causing rot.

Thoughts are greatly appreciated!
Thanks,
Charles
 
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Old 04-06-21, 10:06 AM
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Do you have a photo or sketch of what you are describing?
 
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Old 04-07-21, 05:31 AM
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The dowels will rot if not protected.
 
XSleeper voted this post useful.
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Old 04-12-21, 03:57 AM
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sketch


 
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Old 04-12-21, 01:47 PM
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Butted edge to edge, the boards will rot at the seams over time due to dampness. If it was me I would have a 1/8 to 1/4 gap between horizontal boards. Is that an option in your scheme?
 
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Old 04-12-21, 02:37 PM
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Also, 8' span between posts is quite long. I'd go for closer to every 4'. Don't forget you will have a significant wind load with a solid wall like you intend. Then there is the whole warping issue trying to keep so many deck boards straight over such a long span. I guess that was your intention for the dowels but I don't think that is the correct solution.
 
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Old 04-13-21, 11:56 AM
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One of the things to think about is "have I seen a lot of fences like this, and how do they look?"

Chances are, if you haven't seen them around, it might be because they're impractical in some way. Too expensive to built, too hard to maintain, or don't hold up well.

Before starting a fence (especially since the price of lumber is 3 or 4 times what it was a year ago), I would look for successful installations. Also visit some fencing companies and look thru their catalog and inspect the materials.
 
 

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