Dream gun room


  #1  
Old 11-20-12, 03:58 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
Dream gun room

[I winterized a house yesterday (always last minute panic) for a bank foreclosure. House is listed at $605,000. Wondered why the PO left one book on the book shelf and stripped the rest of the house. Here's why. Enough room for 50 rifles, anything else associated with storage, and possible reloading area. Room measured about 14x14. Unbelievable.

ATTACH]5726[/ATTACH]
 
  #2  
Old 11-20-12, 04:58 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,814
Received 875 Upvotes on 766 Posts
Gotta like those hidden rooms

My son's house has 2 big walk in closets in the master bed rm. He had considered putting a hidden closet in one of them to house his big gun collection.... but he fell on hard times a few yrs ago and sold most of his guns. He's doing fine now but I don't know if he's bought any more firearms to replace the ones he sold.
 
  #3  
Old 11-20-12, 05:02 AM
N
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,511
Received 21 Upvotes on 18 Posts
That is pretty cool.

Are these for closures still a common occurrence down there?
 
  #4  
Old 11-20-12, 03:20 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
Mike, I think what is happening is banks are coming to the full realization when the market tanked, they repossessed properties and are still holding on to them, 3 years later. Some (most) go into a state of disrepair and can't be sold without extensive work. Good market for people in my line of work, if the banks would step up and pay for the work to be done. They are trying to sell "as is", and I don't think many of the properties are worth it.

I virtually had to cut kudzu out of a front entrance on one place to get into the front door. For those yankees who don't know what kudzu is, google it and PM me....I'll send you a sprig.

This property, luckily is a new repo, but I doubt, with the asking price, it will move any time soon. I certainly didn't want to totally winterize it, because I know although the water systems will be safe, all that woodwork you see will be crap in a year's time without HVAC. Sad to say the least.
 
  #5  
Old 11-21-12, 05:03 AM
N
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,511
Received 21 Upvotes on 18 Posts
It's a shame to see that happen down there.
I know a year or so ago, I had the chance to move to FL for a 3+ year visit. When I looked at housing down there, 90% of the listings where short sales or repos.

Anyway, back on topic...
I'd like to hear more about how that room was setup. Although I'll probably never create a room like that here, the idea of a hidden room (in my old nun convent) would be cool.
 
  #6  
Old 11-21-12, 11:28 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,352
Received 2,319 Upvotes on 2,064 Posts
I'm amazed at the number of people I meet that have to have a place move in ready and that includes painting. Painting to change the wall color is more than many want to do. The idea of maintenance, remodeling or repair is totally out of their realm of consciousness.

I'd like to hear more about the secret room. Was the door reinforced? Was there a lock or anything more secure than tipping a book? Is there a portrait on the wall with the eyes cut out so you can spy on people while inside the room?
 
  #7  
Old 11-21-12, 02:20 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,814
Received 875 Upvotes on 766 Posts
PD, me thinks you've been watching too many movies

What has always got me is the folks that pay big money to have a interior decorator pick out the colors for their home...... even if they tell me [privately] that it's not a color combination they like but the decorators says it's the way everyone with big fancy houses does it I painted a 3 story house for a doctor that hired a decorator. The predominate theme throughout the house was pink. I asked if they were sure they wanted their son's room pink - they said yes the decorator says it will look good! I was proud of that little boy when he came home from school and pitched a fit because I painted his bedroom pink
 
  #8  
Old 11-21-12, 03:04 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
Dane, the door wasn't "reinforced" per se, but was stout, and not made of cheap lumber at all. It would glide as smoothly as silk, with little pressure to move it along. The aux lock is above the book, and is keyed. Sort of takes the mystery out of it. As I said the room measures about 14 x 14.





Did I mention the wine room??
 
  #9  
Old 11-22-12, 04:53 AM
N
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,511
Received 21 Upvotes on 18 Posts
I would assume the fact it's 14ftx14ft and has windows (?) that it was more of a gimmick then a hidden room.

If I ever did something like this, I don't think I would go any wider then ~3ft unless it was an addition in the basement which wasn't noticeable (under my front stairs maybe). Still pretty cool stuff.

Would personally like a wine room, but then I'd have to take up drinking wine more regularly then a glass at Christmas.

I was proud of that little boy when he came home from school and pitched a fit because I painted his bedroom pink
I poor kid.
I guess I don't feel so bad now for wanting to put up a engine diagram posters in my boy's room.
 
  #10  
Old 11-22-12, 05:26 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
It has windows, but they are on the second floor and 20' above grade, on the slope side of a mountain. Unless you know (or can figure out) the symmetry of the house, you don't know it's there. I certainly didn't. It appears the tables could have been used for reloading, cleaning or just for beer support while showing off the room, who knows

Wine room and door were custom built. Opening was curved like a dungeon door in the 1500's.

Attachment 5815
 
  #11  
Old 11-22-12, 06:19 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,484
Received 914 Upvotes on 772 Posts
It's nice but I see two issues.

1) Not secure.
2) Not fire rated.

I was going to build a safe room with block, concrete and rebar and a safe door I got off a job but decided to just go with a stand alone safe. I just got the safe and will post some pictures after I get done DIYing it.
 
  #12  
Old 11-22-12, 06:53 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 8 Upvotes on 8 Posts
On track with what TI says about fire rated....
For the life of me, I can't figure out why anyone would build a home like that and not put in a sprinkler system. If it's listing for $600K, you know it was probably $1M+ to build. How much more would a sprinkler system have cost? Maybe 1 or 2% of the price? Probably recover that on fire insurance over 20 yrs. A rusty gun is better than a melted gun.
 
  #13  
Old 11-22-12, 07:33 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,484
Received 914 Upvotes on 772 Posts
You could go with a dry Halon system. Might be more cost effective building the room with concrete and gypsum.
 
  #14  
Old 11-22-12, 07:51 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 8 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Well...I meant a whole house system...Halon might be a bit expensive for that.

And remember..in all the fire simulation videos....it's not so much the home structure that is the initial source, but thing like trashcans, carpet, couches, bedding, etc. Basically the contents of the room are the fuel. Heck...I imagine if all doors were closed in a home (and they were the fire resistant type), most home fires would be less damaging. But who closes all their doors? And of course doors are undercut for ventilation, ducting between rooms, etc.

A single unobtrusive heat activated sprinkler head per room (in most cases) can kill most fires in just a few minutes at most. At least from what I remember reading/seeing.

I wonder if those can somehow be interconnected to shut down HVAC systems?
 
  #15  
Old 11-22-12, 08:24 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
Oh, it has an elaborate sprinkler system throughout the house, including the gun room and wine room. No skimping, there. I prefer dry systems, but this one is wet, yuk.
The bookshelf door is locked above the book with a keyed push pin lock. Maybe not the securest, but being a hidden room to begin with, disguised with the bookshelf, it's pretty secure.
 
  #16  
Old 11-22-12, 08:34 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,352
Received 2,319 Upvotes on 2,064 Posts
Are dry systems even available anymore? I think halon is only used in aircraft or expensive electronics environments because of the cost. I doubt you could use CO2 in a residential environment for fear of suffocating anyone in the house.
 
  #17  
Old 11-22-12, 08:52 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
What I was referring to may only be available commercially, but the system is filled with air and water is held back somehow until one of the terminals is activated, releasing the air, and subsequently the water. Not sure how it works totally, but we had one at the airport in the building we worked in. It was nice because it required no winterization and the pipes could be run on the dock as well as in the building.
 
  #18  
Old 11-23-12, 03:47 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,814
Received 875 Upvotes on 766 Posts
Larry, I painted a house in fla years ago that had that type of sprinkler system. Talking with the installers led me to believe they were all filled with air until a fire/heat turned on the water. Previously I had thought the pipes were full of water but after that job I thought they were all filled with air. Strange how just a tid bit of info can change your perception of something.
 
  #19  
Old 11-23-12, 06:22 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,484
Received 914 Upvotes on 772 Posts
Oh, it has an elaborate sprinkler system throughout the house, including the gun room and wine room
Problem solved then.

The Halon systems I run into are in server rooms. They don't like dumping thousands of gallons of water on the servers. Also, in commercial settings, the HVAC roof top units have smoke detectors that will shut down the system to prevent smoke transmission. We also have a lot of sprinkler systems that have air in the system when they are in freezing locations.
 
  #20  
Old 11-23-12, 07:07 AM
N
Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,511
Received 21 Upvotes on 18 Posts
We don't use Halon here anymore. Our server room which is ~6yrs old uses another chemical which will kill you a bit slower if you are napping in the server room when the system goes off.
It's the same idea as Halon, just a bit less poisonous. I'll walk over a bit later and get the name as I can't remember it off the top of my head.

The more I think about this discussion... The more I am starting to think that I may want to look into something for at home (in the mechanical room and kitchen anyway). Our house being 1930's lumber... If we have a fire, it is going down to the ground.
 
  #21  
Old 11-23-12, 01:49 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,352
Received 2,319 Upvotes on 2,064 Posts
I've had similar thoughts about my home. When I built it 10+ years ago keeping the cost down and getting it built on schedule were my main concerns. Now that I have time and my financial position is better some things like a sprinkler or other fire system sound better and better. My biggest fear is the vehicles/equipment in the garages. I lost part of a rental house this fall to a vehicle fire that was parked in the driveway in front of the car port. If it had been in my garage the house would be gone.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: