Ammo Prices

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Old 11-20-13, 07:00 AM
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Ammo Prices

I went shooting the other weekend and have an itch for another handgun. Primary reason being that I don't particularly like shooting my S&W 910S. It just feels too bulky. May just be the rubber grips I put on it. Regardless, I have my eyes on a Ruger SR1911, which is a .45 auto. I'm concerned about ammo prices though. However, I've found .45 auto rounds online that aren't much more costly than 9mm. Doesn't appear that .45 ammo is that much more expensive. I don't shoot very often, so it probably doesn't make much difference.
 
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Old 11-20-13, 07:30 AM
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I don't own a .45 (yet) but a buddy of mine carries federal law enforcement credentials and his off duty piece is a .45 and his big complaint has been the cost of ammo to practice. He has no intention of changing since this is the caliber he believes most likely to save his or someone else's life if he has to draw and fire for real.

Just shooting at paper, my first 50 rounds are always .22 just to keep the cost down. Then I usually switch to something larger and put 50 rounds through that gun. After that I'm usually done.
 
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Old 11-20-13, 07:59 AM
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I found some federal ammunition online that is about 0.57 a round, compared to 0.42 a round for 9mm, so doesn't seem too bad.

...just found some Remington .45 auto ammo for 0.48/round. Think I'm going to go ahead and get the Ruger SR1911!
 
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Old 11-20-13, 12:52 PM
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Didn't think of it earlier but there are often .22 conversion kits you can get for the 1911 style weapons so you can still be holding the same gun but spending less per shot at the target.
 
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Old 11-20-13, 04:49 PM
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I do trigger pull practice with .22 and dry firing where a big bang and recoil is not needed but I still have to get a lot of practice with higher calibers to prevent a flinch. I'm not "a natural" so I have to stay in practice with rounds that kick. I notice the affect even more with rifles. Shooting a.22LR or .17HMR is great practice but it does little to prepare me for the concussion of the center fire rifles I sometimes use for hunting.
 
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Old 11-20-13, 04:52 PM
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Yep, that's why I start with .22 but finish with something bigger.
 
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Old 11-20-13, 05:49 PM
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But PD...normally hunting is just one or 2 shots a day. If you do everything else right, from the small caliber practice...hopefully you won't develop any jerks or flinches.

I guess I'm more sort of a "natural". I shot all the Navy guns I could, including the Marines and SEALS when they were embarked and never had an issue. I don't hunt anymore, but still enjoy punching itty bitty holes in targets. Man I need to go more...been 6 months since I even went to the indoor range.

Maybe when we quit having wifey herniated discs and $400 cat tooth dental work, I will. The shelves are still bare except at the gun shops and I refuse to pay $30 for white box .45. No way, no how. If I go to the range 2 or 3 times...what I have will be almost gone. 500 each for .45 and 9mm, about the same in .380, maybe 750 of various .22 including shot, BB, and shorts.

Unfortunately...some of the folks out here in AZ are contributing to the bare shelves. I've heard several people say they go to Wally World and Big5 (sporting goods) every day just to check and buy whatever they can. I mean, the shelves are BARE, except for some odd stuff used just for hunting. 7.62 X 54 and similar.
 
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Old 11-20-13, 06:03 PM
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Shelves are bare here in VA as well. I figured it was because manufacturers were making less ammo because of all the hype about gun control legislation. You're saying it's because people are buying it up so fast that manufacturers can't keep up? Wow.
 
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Old 11-21-13, 04:56 PM
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Yep, the demand for ammo has been out of control for a year now, ever since the shooting in CT.
 
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Old 11-21-13, 06:31 PM
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Anyone here make their own ammo? I've heard you can take a class for a couple hundred bucks and get all the equipment you need for about $350. Sounds tempting. However, apparently the slugs can be difficult to get a hold of.
 
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Old 11-21-13, 06:45 PM
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Demand has been through the roof since our current President was elected. The shootings in CT, Virginia Tech, Columbine... only further fuel the fire. Politics aside, Democrats seem to do wonders for guns & ammunition sales. Even the AWB had little affect other than to increase manufacturers profits. All a politician has to do is mention regulating anything gun and everyone runs to the store buying anything they can.
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Every interview and press release from manufacturers says they are producing and expanding capacity as fast as possible. Demand simply exploded and supply can not grow fast enough. I have been noticing things improving over the past few months though I doubt I will ever be able to buy 1'000 rounds of 9mm for less than $100 again.
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I used to reload but that was one of the things to go as life got busier. It was especially helpful when I was shooting a lot of .45 Long Colt. A simple round to reload but expensive to buy new, retail.
 
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Old 11-22-13, 08:26 AM
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All a politician has to do is mention regulating anything gun and everyone runs to the store buying anything they can.
I know. It's ridiculous. Someone should tell people to chill. No one is going to take their guns away. Leave some ammo for the rest of us!

I just bought a 0.45 auto so reloading my own cartridges sounds appealing. I don't shoot much, but I would probably go more often if I could make my own rounds. Are prices for raw reloading materials going up as well? Does $350 sound about right for a complete kit? About how much do the materials typically cost, let's say for 9mm, .38, and .45? And do local dealers typically carry the raw materials or would I need to get them online?

Found this Hornady kit on Amazon for $295. Got good reviews. Hornady Manufacturing Company :: Reloading :: Metallic Reloading :: Presses and Kits :: Lock-N-Load Classic :: Lock-N-LoadŽ Classic Kit

This one too: Amazon.com: ATK/RCBS 9286 Explorer Reloading Kit: Sports & Outdoors
 

Last edited by mossman; 11-22-13 at 08:56 AM.
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Old 11-22-13, 09:40 AM
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I'd say both of those kits are for a hunter or experimenter. For any sort of volume, you're going to want a progressive or semi-progressive press. I have a old Lee Pro 1000 (still stored away unfortunately) which is what I started out on. Never had an issue. Start slow and as the rhythm builds I can easily do 500 an hour if I want to. It's refilling the cases and primers that slow you down. I used to do that on weekends in the Navy. Load 1000 Friday night, go to the range Sat and Sun.

The Pro 1000 only does pistol calibers, but it's very inexpensive. I paid around $100 when I bought mine at a gun show, now they run around $160. The Lee Turret Press is heavier duty and can do rifles, but it takes more manual actions.

You'd want a digital scale (don't mess around the the beam type). Do you have a very solid bench to mount to? If not, you'd need a stand or base. A couple of manuals ($15-20 ea). A bullet puller. A case tumbler. Prob a few other things I've forgotten.


$250-300 would get most of it. Even better if you can find it used. Though if you look at the Dillon site, the stuff I listed would run over $700 MSRP. You just have to decide what you are going to be doing and how often.

The brass, powder, primers, and bullets can normally be found at any good gun shop. You can also order online, but the shipping can be as much as what you are buying. 1000 230 grain .45 bullets are pretty heavy.

Contrary to popular belief, you don't save money be reloading....you're just able to shoot more for the same amount. If you want to save money, sell all but one gun and go to the range once a month and shoot one box.
 
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Old 11-22-13, 09:59 PM
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I've heard good things about Lee. I'll look into it. I'm interested in pistol cartridges only (9 mm, .38, and .45).
 
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Old 11-23-13, 10:16 AM
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As I found out from ammo manufacturers and mentioned in another thread in this forum topic, ammo producers use to be able to make enough ammo and supplies in one 8 hour working shift 5 days a week. Not so any more. Once word was out about a BAN on some models of semi auto fire rifles, an assumption was made ammo would be restricted or banned as well. Not so.

Result. PANIC BUYING everything and anything associated with guns!

Ammo producers over head costs also skyrocketed with 24/7 hour work shifts. Adding to the wholesale manufacturing costs plus some undisclosed price padding to increase profits....

Same applies to some ammo retailers increasing prices to benefit their profit margins as well....... Demand goes up. Inventory goes down. Prices go UP! Fair and free market system at work. Supply and Demand.

As for myself and many others like yourselves, love the sport then have to pay the price or go to range less and or go less and shoot less. Until supply returns if ever. Prices? Likely to go down some but do not re-lie on lower costs. Logic: WHY would ammo producers lower prices when supply equals demand. Lower prices equal LESS profits! Explain that to the shareholders! Not likely to be well received....

Never in all my years pro actively involved in the sport have I ever seen the current ammo conditions.

Nor would I have ever thought my Christmas Wish List this year would have a single item on it.

AMMO!

Holiday guests coming to my house this year, as they all have been every year and in years prior, all have been informed to bring 3 items:

FOOD, ADULT BEVERAGES and >>>AMMO
 
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Old 11-23-13, 03:29 PM
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I started with Lee long ago. They have products that are good quality for the price. They are not the highest precision available but for the price they are a good place to start. I can't tell you how many 9mm and .45LC I loaded with my basic Lee tower. When I got a bit more money I bought the primer insertion tool to speed the process.
 
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Old 11-30-13, 07:22 PM
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