Ammo Recommendation

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Old 01-20-16, 02:15 AM
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Ammo Recommendation

I bought a used Chiappa 1911-22 for my wife and daughter to use at the range. Nice little .22, in excellent shape, but struggles with the inexpensive ammo they have at the range. Have been to the range twice with it (once with each girl) and am experiencing a lot of failure to eject or failure to load new round. While in some respects it is great training for a couple of novice shooters on how unjam a firearm, I would like it to be a little more reliable. The range carries American Eagle .22LR ammo. I'm looking for recommended alternatives that would be a bit more powerful and not jam every other shot.

The first trip to the range I thought it had settled into a groove as the last 30 rounds went through perfectly without hitch. However, the second time (my daughters first ever) it was doing it again while she was having her lesson.

On a positive note, some of the boys at the range were overly impressed how well my daughter was shooting. It's normal to look at the targets of those who are shooting next to you. When they saw a 100lb girl behind the partition they couldn't believe it was her that was shooting. Even her instructor said she was a natural. Must run in the family.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 06:23 AM
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I have never owned or even shot a Chiappa but I have had troubles with .22 pistols before. If it's something with the gun it's often been a problem with the extractor. It may be binding. Might not be strong enough to grip the case or could be worn and no longer has a sharp edge to grip the case.

Other than that simply getting off cheap ammo has helped a lot. Unfortunately quality .22LR is still very difficult to find. I've had good luck with CCI Velocitor and pretty good with Stinger. There used to be several offerings with nickel plated cases and they also did well but I haven't seen them on the shelves since Obama took office.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 06:50 AM
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Assuming that you have more than one, I would see if the problem might be isolated to a particular magazine.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 06:52 AM
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The guy at the range recommended CCI Mini Mags, but I know nothing about ammo. I think the problem is that the cheap ammo isn't throwing the slide back far enough to allow time for the casing to eject. A lot of them end up half out of the shoot and the slide gets hung on it which prevents the next round from loading. Anyway, I don't know anything about grains and stuff. I think the eagle's were 38 grains, mini mag's 40 grains. Is that a big difference?
 
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Old 01-20-16, 07:51 AM
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"Grains" marked on a box of factory ammo refer to the projectile weight. "Grains" to a reloader also refers to the propellant weight--but isn't listed on a box of factory ammo.

The nickle plated cases PD mentioned are a little harder & slicker so might eject easier. Trying a new (and better) magazine might solve the problem. I'd assume the manufacturer tested the model with a variety of ammo to insure it's reliable. It's always good to have more than one magazine--especially for a .22 since they're cheap so you tend to shoot more & faster
IF the problem is the original mag, replacing it will allow you to shoot that cheap ammo & save money over the long haul. Magazine problems exist in ALL pistols and some are just better made than others. An experienced counter guy at the range should be able to assist.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 02:48 PM
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How does a magazine prevent a shell from properly ejecting? I can see not loading next round in the chamber, but these jams are from a casing getting pulled out and then not clearing the gun before the slide returns. I don't follow the logic.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 02:56 PM
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The next round coming up from the magazine helps in the ejection process, too. As the spent casing is pulled from the chamber, the pressure of the new round from the mag pushes upward. Not enough pressure upward and you will have stovepipes.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 03:27 PM
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A few other things besides ammo and mags. Most all newer .22 pistols are straight blow back action. Basically the slide isn't locked to the frame at any point. This design also uses a fixed barrel unlike a real 1911 where the barrel tilts and moves back slightly. The gasses from firing are what push on the casing, and thus the slide, back and out of the chamber. The chamber needs to be clean and smooth. The slide rails need the same as well as a touch of lube occasionally (less is more).

You have to expect a break in period also...per the manual...

"ATTENTION: For best performance of the 1911-22 we recommend the use of
quality .22 LR ammunition with a minimum velocity of 335 m/s ( 1100 f/s)
Please allow 100-150 rounds for initial “Break-In” period."

Also...

"Before firing the pistol for the first time, Field Strip and clean the firearm following proper
procedures. For proper Break-in of the firearm shoot 100-150 rounds of High-velocity, quality
Factory Ammunition, cleaning and lubricating the gun every 200-300 rounds."

Looking at the American Eagle products, they list velocity at 1260 FPS but that's normally out of a rifle length barrel I believe. It would be less from a short barrel. Mini Mags list the same with a lighter bullet and they cost more so I dunno if they would make that much difference. Can't always believe what people at the range (or on Internet help forums...lol) say.

One thing I do believe is to buy a box of every brand you can find and see what shoots best...after following the manufacturers instructions for break in and cleaning of course. I've had 4 Rugers (still have 2) and though I've never had a single malfunction with any of them, some brands of ammo shot more accurately in one pistol than the others.

Finally, if this is a brand new pistol, contact the company and ask for help. Maybe what ammo they use for testing or maybe they'll send a new mag. They are located in Dayton OH
 
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Old 01-20-16, 03:40 PM
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Thanks Vic, good to have you back around here.

I bought the gun used, although it is in great shape, so I assumed it had already gone through the breaking period. The guy a the range recommended Mini Mags even though they don't carry them. He had said that he has the same gun and that is what he found worked.

Still not buying the magazine end of things, but I only have one at this time so I can't test that theory. My brain works funny that way, everything needs to make logical sense.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 04:08 PM
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Well, even used, they may be able to help. Happened with a Taurus I bought used. Broke the firing pin dry firing and they said "Just send it back Lifetime warranty means Lifetime warranty".
 
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Old 01-20-16, 04:21 PM
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As I had assumed, and Vic confirmed, there are differences between this and a "traditional" 1911, so I don't know how this applies. And I cannot explain all of the intricacies myself, nor am I trying to make a case for a magazine problem, but you asked, so, from Jerry Kuhnhausen's .45 auto shop manual, some feeding issues directly related to the magazine include rough or bent lips, bent follower, or bent or weak spring. And I can tell you from experience that some of these can be hard to spot. My only thought is that you're going to want more than one mag eventually anyway, so get another one, and try it. If the problem goes away with a different mag, you know where to start. If it doesn't, you aren't necessarily out anything. The problem, if you want to call it that, with a 1911 is that for something that looks so simple, it is actually a very precise and somewhat complicated machine, especially considering that it has been around for 100 years, and narrowing down problems with the precise angle of the ramp and things like that can get quite complicated, so makes sense to start with the simple things. The basic platform is very durable, and has served our nation well in a multitude of environments and conditions, but I suspect may be a bit more finicky with .22 rounds than traditional .45's.
 
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Old 01-20-16, 04:30 PM
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I have two .45 mags laying in my "junk" pile because, first, they were cheap and secondly they stovepiped every 5th round. My cousin gunsmith told me it was the mainspring being made of inferior metal and staying loaded for prolonged time tended to compress it. It doesn't happen on quality metal.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 04:24 AM
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Is the magazine spring replaceable should I order another one and find that was indeed the problem? Hate to start a junk pile on my first purchase, although I didn't spend that much money on the gun, you could say I already have a pile of junk.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 04:33 AM
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Replacing the springs may cost more than the magazines. For instance 3 Chiappa Magazines 1911 22 22 Long Rifle 10 Round Polymer Black | eBay
 
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Old 01-21-16, 04:46 AM
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I would go the complete mag route, because the spring is only one component; replacing it alone does not address the possibility of the follower, lips, or anything else that might exist. And again, not saying it's the problem, but it's something that you can do yourself, without having to take it to a 'smith. In the interest of cost though, if you haven't yet, clean and inspect the mag itself. I'm sure that many people set their mag's off to the side when they clean their pistols, and ignore the lint or whatever that may have collected there. Wanted to suggest too that if you don't have one you might put a loader on the gift list for your wife and/or daughter. whenever it fits the budget. My wife like's my .45's, but not the "bark", so I bought her a Sig P238 a couple of years ago. It's smaller than mine or yours, but based on the 1911 design, and I had a heck of a time pressing the smaller .380 rounds into the mag, so I imagine that the .22's are tough, but the loader makes it a cakewalk.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 06:44 AM
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Thanks pedro, could you provide a link to a good loader so I am on the same page and can begin working into the wish list.

Took the wife shooting and the larger guns were too much for her. She struggled with the trigger pull as she doesn't have the grip strength (which is why I am the official jar opener in the house). Tried several different 9mm's and a .380. Then my 18 yr old daughter expressed interest so as part of her holiday stocking stuffer I promised her a lesson and visit to the range (first time). Bought the 1911-22 as a good first gun to work with. Minimal recoil, good hand fit, great trainer and both seem to enjoy it. I have already picked mine out, just have to hit the lottery to swing the extra to buy it. lol
 
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Old 01-21-16, 10:40 AM
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The one I have is an HKS model 943... magloaders

It does the job, so I'm satisfied with it, but my opinion is that, as far as good or bad ones, it's a tool, and not something exclusive like a miter saw or whatever that every one has a different opinion on, but more like say a general purpose screwdriver that anyone can pick up and use. So would I recommend HKS if they have one for your application, sure, but I'm equally sure that any brand will do the job for you as long as it fits your mag. You slip it around the mag, lay the bullets down, one at a time, just like you're doing now, and a thumb activated lever presses them down. I don't need nor even have one for .45's, but find it hard to press the smaller calibers in.
 
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Old 01-21-16, 03:21 PM
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Some, but not all .22 magazines utilize a pull down mechanism to compress the spring so you can just drop the rounds in it. I use the UpLula reloader for my 9 mm and .45's. Just set the mag on the table and cover it with the reloader and as fast as you can release and compress the handle you can drop in rounds.

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Old 01-21-16, 04:08 PM
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I'm not positive but I think Rugers come with a little plastic piece that drops over the mag and you use your thumb to compress the spring and just drop rounds in. Easier on the thumb than the little button. Maybe I got it aftermarket?

In case you can't tell, I think Rugers are the best .22 pistols made. At least the best that normal people can afford.
 
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Old 01-22-16, 05:38 AM
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Vic, I'll agree with you on the Ruger .22's. My grandson shoots this one when we go to the range in Colorado, and he's pretty darned good with it for only being 7 years old.

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Old 01-22-16, 07:30 AM
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For once I must disagree (slightly) with Vic. I have a Ruger MarkII (Target version) and it's a fun and reliable gun but I reserve "best" for a gun that isn't made from a welded stamping, and is easier to field strip. My Ruger is the most difficult to remove the bolt for cleaning of any of my rifles & handguns.

Just splitting hairs, really, but Best Value is accurate IMO.
 
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Old 01-27-16, 03:05 AM
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would try some different ammo and see how it does before replacing anything, cci is about the most reliable there is for a 22 but kinda expensive, you might also try the cci blazer ammo for a cheaper alternative.
would avoid the loose bulk packs and look at boxed ammo for better reliability.
 
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Old 04-05-16, 05:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Czizzi
How does a magazine prevent a shell from properly ejecting?
Originally Posted by Chandler
The next round coming up from the magazine helps in the ejection process, too. As the spent casing is pulled from the chamber, the pressure of the new round from the mag pushes upward. Not enough pressure upward and you will have stovepipes.
I agree with what Chandler wrote. When I used to rent before I owned, I had an incident with a glock 9mm that jammed 3 times within 10 minutes. Jams always freak me out. Anyway, when I unjammed it and brought it back to the range master, instead of giving me another gun, he told me to try out another magazine. After that, it was fine. The spring on the second magazine was more firm. I could have used a pen and shoved it all the way down on the first magazine.

Ever since I started to own (always bought mine new), I rarely have jams, including shooting range ammo, turner's or walmart ammo (Winchester).

I also have the HKS Loader too. Personally, it was fine at the beginning but after a while, I just went back to traditional hand loading.
 

Last edited by WRDIY; 04-05-16 at 05:42 AM.
 

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