Shooting gloves

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  #1  
Old 03-11-18, 06:02 PM
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Shooting gloves

Apparently I seem to be getting old?? It appears I am developing some arthritis/tendonitis in my hands, esp the right hand and esp in my thumb and the meaty part under it. Some of it may be due to overuse because of loss of feeling from my left thumb cutting incident from last year. My left isn't very dexterous anymore.

So I'd like to get back to doing some shooting as the weather gets nicer, we have a great indoor facility locally but it's kind of pricy (charges X per hour), so I prefer the outdoor range even though it's further away as they have a better price for all day occasional use and a very reasonable yearly membership fee.

My preferred guns will be .22 Ruger autopistols and 10/22 rifle, .380 ACP in a Colt Pocketlight, and .45 ACP in various steel 1911 models. The last 2 of course will be hardest on my hand, and the .45s are the ones I shoot best...so any recommendations on shooting gloves (if you've used them). Or possibly other methods of mitigating problems? I've heard the gloves can be very effective...but they are normally only mentioned in conjunction with heavies like hot .44 Spec, .44 Mag, and so forth.

Hate to spend the bucks to find I could have gotten as good results with a pair of deerskin work gloves from HD.
 
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Old 03-12-18, 05:55 AM
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Do you want gloves for recoil protection or just to help with your grip on the gun?
 
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Old 03-12-18, 06:33 AM
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GG, I enjoy shooting, but don't know anything about specific gloves. But in regard to your hand, if you haven't yet, please do get your sugar level checked. If you were to see me, and spend a couple days working with me, whether on the job or in the shop, you'd say I was fine and fit. In fact several doctors have told me that I am in excellent shape for the average 40 year male, even knowing that I am past 60. But my doggone sugar level was high. Not off the chart or anything, but higher than "normal". Concurrently, my right hand was bothering me, no pain whatsoever, but a little loss of control, got cold more quickly, couldn't straighten some of the fingers all the way, and noticed a change in the muscle at the base of the thumb, similar to what you mentioned. I had a similar situation, not exactly the same, but close enough in my left hand about 16 years ago, and that was due to nerve damage in my elbow, which fortunately healed itself without surgery, so I wrote it off to that. But the doctor said no, and sure enough, as my sugar has come down I am regaining full use and control of my right hand. It's not perfect yet, but significantly better. I'm stupid at this type of thing, well a lot of things, but wanted to share in case it might help.
 
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Old 03-12-18, 01:12 PM
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Recoil PD. I think like the PAST brand? Ever used any of that type?

Thx Pedro...but my tests show I'm in pretty good health except for my self inflicted liver damage...and even that is normal range. If I take it easy, ice the area, and wear a thumb splint for a couple of days...the pain and such pretty much goes away....but as soon as I stupidly start turning wrenches...it comes back. I even try to avoid using the thumb button on my mouse and use a stylus on the TV remote. I know the Doc is gonna say, do the ice and splint thing for 2-3 weeks...but that's easier said than done. Even then, I'm sure it will probably recur with normal hand tool usage (or possibly shooting). Using a pen or small tools like files and dental scrapers and such is no problem. Just wrenches, sockets and turning larger screwdrivers (luckily have electric or pneumatic for some of that).

The dexterity issue is w/my left hand...and that's just because I put my thumb on the blade of my table saw last year. Numb from the knuckle joint out and not as flexible.
 
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Old 03-12-18, 01:56 PM
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Can you sleep with the splint on? If so, I'd see what happens just wearing it at night.
 
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Old 03-12-18, 03:51 PM
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Glad that's the case GG, because it's probably better, long term, than the scenario I mentioned. And I hope you nor anyone else thought it rude that I asked, but I didn't ask. It was just a suggestion because it really did sound a lot like what I had, and I guess that I could have PM'd it, but figured that it might be a little bit of a nudge to get it checked to others who saw it. As for your situation though, they prescribed a splint for the situation with the other hand that I mentioned, and that thing was a real pain in the butt during the day, so I ended up doing as Stickshift mentioned, wearing it just at night, and I don't know if maybe that made it take longer to heal, but it did heal, so I'd try that too.
 
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Old 03-12-18, 07:50 PM
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No prob Pedro...heck, like I said...getting older...we start to tell our medical history to strangers in the checkout line...right? lol
 
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Old 03-12-18, 07:55 PM
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Guess the icing and sleeping with the stupid brace will probably be my best bet. You know how it is though..half awake and you feel this thing grabbing your hand?? Had a foot cast once and they had to cut the sides to make it removable at night while I slept cause I'd have near panic attack events when I tried to move my legs ( I'm a big flip flopper).

Still want to try a glove for later though. Hey, PD...you have any 1911's? I'm thinking maybe a flat backstrap would help also. Mine all are curved right now.
 
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Old 03-12-18, 08:05 PM
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For work I have been using the dipped foam gloves and I love them! They have a good non-slip grip, I can feel things, and they are tactile enough I can pick a small screw off the ground. Honestly, I would just go to HD or a farm/fleet store and try on a bunch of gloves until you find one that fits nice. They have all sorts geared toward all sorts of activities.
 
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Old 03-12-18, 10:54 PM
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Thanks TI...but I'm really looking for the impact/recoil absorption of a purpose built glove. I have different types for different uses...but none really cushion the palm that well, even the mechanics type. They are more about absorbing vibration and/or protecting knuckles and such. Some of the shooting gloves actually have a gel that stiffens upon sharp impact (I believe) which is way more than just high density padding.

Was hoping to find someone that shot pistols a lot who had some direct insight. May need to go to a shooting specific site of some sort.
 
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Old 03-13-18, 04:18 AM
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Have you asked at the gun range?
 
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