Double wall chimney


  #1  
Old 02-25-03, 11:45 AM
Jayhawk
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Double wall chimney

Is there a big difference between double and triple wall chimney for a wood burning stove? I'm going to install a wood burning stove in the garage. I've got 8' of double wall that was given to me. Triple wall is extremely expensive. Can I get by with double? I've got a small cast iron box stove.
 
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Old 02-25-03, 05:09 PM
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As Doug the Moderator always says, and I agree, check your local ordinances and building codes first.

Double wall will do just fine. But often times finding the exact pipe by manufacturer is difficult. Please do not try to connect different manufacturers pipes together. At best they will only come close to fitting together properly. (If 8ft. is not enough)
Also, please make sure the stove you are installing is fitted with a baffle. The baffle prevents the flame from the fire to go directly into the stove pipe and in direct contact with creosote that will subsequently build up. The reason why I mention it, is its alot easier to solve that problem before installation.

And a question: are you replacing the stove and pipe, or starting from scratch?
 
  #3  
Old 02-25-03, 05:41 PM
Jayhawk
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Thanks for the info. The stove is a new "Vogelzang" cast iron box. The double wall is new in the box made by Supervent and is "UL" and "ULC" certified. The installation is from scratch...no hole in the roof yet. The floor and wall are concrete. The chimney has to go through about 2-3 feet of attic space. I've puchased a ceiling support kit from Lowes thet apparently has the pieces to go through ceiling and roof. I don't know of any ordinances or codes that pertain out here in the sticks. Any pointers, hints or tips are appreciated.
 
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Old 02-26-03, 12:34 PM
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As Doug the Moderator always says, and I agree, check your local ordinances and building codes first. Even in the sticks. Fire safety, and easily followed codes are worth the inquiry.

Heres the best tip I can give you. BEFORE cutting anything. Place the stove where you think you want it, giving the adaquate clearances to walls, combustables...etc Also allow room for the proper placement of wall protection and air space if needed. Now, start connecting the stove pipe to the stove up to the ceiling(if any). Look to see if any structural supports will be in the way, from the ceiling to the roof. The straighter the run from stove to the eventual chimney cap above the roof line the better. If you need to adjust the stove placement to avoid additional "angled" stovepipe, to avoid rafters/supports, do it. The kit you have purchased should include instructions and a template for the eventual cut in the roof.
Now, onto seperate but important exterior considerations. Where is the chimney going to be in relation to the peak of the roof? Dominant wind direction during the burning season?
Please DO NOT make any cuts until the entire process has been determined. Including access to the roof for cleaning. Once the cut has been made you are committed to the process.

At some point in time you may be selling your home, dont let a few simple steps, by following safety and local building codes prevent the sale of your home at inspection. Or you and your family safety.
The question I always ask people, "under what conditions would you start a fire on purpose in your home(garage)?" You wouldnt! so IF you are, make it as safe as possible.
 
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Old 02-26-03, 12:43 PM
Jayhawk
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The chimney would be downslope but upwind of the nearest peak. Also would like to know if double wall chimney from the inside stove pipe to the outdoors is ok. Nothing is going to be done till this is well planned and approved.
 
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Old 02-26-03, 12:48 PM
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Originally posted by Jayhawk
The chimney would be downslope but upwind of the nearest peak. Also would like to know if double wall chimney from the inside stove pipe to the outdoors is ok. Nothing is going to be done till this is well planned and approved.
Double wall be fine. The exterior pipe, probably in your kit, will be different then the pipe used inside. The general rule is the exterior portion of the chimney must be 2 ft. above any peak within 10 ft.
 
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Old 02-26-03, 01:19 PM
Jayhawk
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Thanks Big
This should get me through the planning stage. On to the approval stage.
 
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Old 02-26-03, 02:03 PM
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Happy to help.
Anymore questions, I'll be around.


BB
 
  #9  
Old 07-06-07, 11:16 PM
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Post HOW MUCH clearance

I have a zero clearance fireplace MADE for a mobile home. It was given to me. It was originally installed in a mobile home and removed to switch to a pellet stove.

I KNOW the clearance needed for the fireplace itself, but when putting the double wall stove pipe through the ceiling and the roof, I am wondering about something. Can the pipe come in contact with the roof, or the ceiling material?

If NOT what do I do with the gap?

THANKS in advance.
 
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Old 07-07-07, 04:15 AM
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I don't know the code but the stove pipe should never come in contact with a combustible material. Masonary or metal is always used to span the gap.
 
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Old 07-07-07, 11:29 PM
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Post Thanks

NOW, at some point isn't the stove pipe going to come into contact with the metal roof? OR do I leave a gap there also and use something to cover that gap?
 
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Old 07-08-07, 04:29 AM
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I wouldn't think there would be a problem with the stove pipe connecting to a metal roof as the metal isn't combustible. You will need to make sure that it isn't too close to any wood framing. You will need flashing to seal where the pipe goes out the roof.
 
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Old 07-08-07, 08:38 AM
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MAY be a dumb question but....

the metal roof is going to contact combustible material. Does the heat dissipate so rapidly on a big roof exposed to the outside that it doesn't matter? When I got this I got a bright shiny pipe that fits inside an larger not shiny pipe. There is more airspace between the two than I see on the triple wall pipe I once had. BOTH pipes connect to the zero clearance fireplace. I understand about not contacting combustible materials. How far must it be? This "zero clearance" fireplace actually requires a one inch clearance from any comustible material. Will that suffice for the pipe?

Just FYI the people that gave it to me got it when they bought their mobile home. It was installed. When they took it out he repaired the hole before I got there so there was no reference as to the clearance there.

Thanks for all the help thus far guys.
 
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Old 07-08-07, 11:41 AM
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The metal helps to disappate heat but sooner or later the metal has to connect to wood unless everything is masonary. I don't know what the code is for stove pipe. There is a specific minimum distance from the pipe to combustibles. If you can't contact the manufacture, I'd suggest asking at the zoning office or maybe the fire marshall.
 
  #15  
Old 08-19-07, 08:33 PM
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Thanks

thanks to all that responded to this. It's been to hot to be on the roof installing this but I hope to in about a month.

Thanks again
 
 

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