Cast-in-place vs. stainless steel liners

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Old 01-06-04, 09:24 AM
brindlegoose
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Cast-in-place vs. stainless steel liners

I've been told by a chimney sweep that we should not use our wood-burning fireplace until we correct an apparent gap in the lining of the chimney.

I'm looking at possible solutions now. The cheapest seems to be a stainless steel liner inserted within the existing chimney. The most expensive seems to be a complete dismantling and rebuilding of the entire chimney. One contractor suggested a middle ground - a cast-in-place liner (Guardian Chimney Liner). He said that its cheaper than rebuilding the entire chimney but is very safe and would hold up better over time than a stainless liner. I don't have an official estimate yet, but anticipate the cost for this would be between $2-3k. From what I understand this is about twice as much as a steel liner but about half of a complete rebuild.

We're planning on staying in this house for a long time, so I'd like a permanent fix for this problem. The contractor specifically told me that the stainless steel would not hold up over time and that he recently had to replace one that was completely warped after 6 or 7 years. Is this true? I can't find much information on the cast-in-place systems.

Thank you in advance for your help!
 
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Old 01-06-04, 07:06 PM
T
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As it happens I'm looking into the same thing right now as my homeowners is telling me I need to have mine lined before June.I know of one company that is called Supa-flu that does a cast in place type liner. I think if you just plug the name into a search engine of your choice you will come up with something on it. Good Luck.
 
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Old 01-07-04, 10:00 AM
brindlegoose
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Toni, thanks for the information on Supa-flu. I'll definitely look into it.

The one thing I'm really concerned about is whether the stainless steel liners are really as short-lived as he said. I'm not sure if I'm being scammed into going for the more expensive option.
 
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Old 01-08-04, 08:40 AM
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Cool

I don't know the expected life of a ss liner, but there may be some kind of limited warranty by the manufacturer or installer that would give you an idea.
I've seen the cast-in-place liners installed on the Bob Vila show. They used some kind of inflated rubber tube, and poured the cement around it. Looks like it would last a very long time.
 
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Old 01-08-04, 04:20 PM
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Re: Cast-in-place vs. stainless steel liners

Originally posted by brindlegoose
I've been told by a chimney sweep that we should not use our wood-burning fireplace until we correct an apparent gap in the lining of the chimney.

I'm looking at possible solutions now. The cheapest seems to be a stainless steel liner inserted within the existing chimney. The most expensive seems to be a complete dismantling and rebuilding of the entire chimney. One contractor suggested a middle ground - a cast-in-place liner (Guardian Chimney Liner). He said that its cheaper than rebuilding the entire chimney but is very safe and would hold up better over time than a stainless liner. I don't have an official estimate yet, but anticipate the cost for this would be between $2-3k. From what I understand this is about twice as much as a steel liner but about half of a complete rebuild.

We're planning on staying in this house for a long time, so I'd like a permanent fix for this problem. The contractor specifically told me that the stainless steel would not hold up over time and that he recently had to replace one that was completely warped after 6 or 7 years. Is this true? I can't find much information on the cast-in-place systems.

Thank you in advance for your help!
Please remember, no matter what choice you go with, either could be in need of replacement again in short time, due to poor burning habits.
My choice would be stainless steel positive connection to your appliance.
What type of fireplace do you have? Where is the gap? Have you been able to inspect the problem yourself? What caused the gap?
 
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