Willow Trees for firewood


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Old 01-15-06, 07:59 AM
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Willow Trees for firewood

Hello,I cut down some willow trees around my stock tank and I was wondering if I could burn it in the fireplace after it dries out. I didn't know if it pops alot or puts off a bad smoke smell
 
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Old 01-15-06, 05:24 PM
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Whether wood pops a lot or not depends largely on how dry the wood is. Willow is very soft wood and it burns very quickly. It's great for firewood because it isn't good for much else- it burns about like paper. It's not like harder woods that last a long time and turn into coals.
 
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Old 01-16-06, 02:47 PM
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willow wood for kindling

As an arborist and tree expert, I'm always looking for people to take the wood from willow tree removals. Willow wood is mostly water and takes a long time to dry out. If unsplit, it rots before it drys out. My suggestion for firewood is found in this poem. " Ashwood wet or ashwood dry A King shall dry his slippers by"

I use ash almost exclusively. It really burns well when its just cut and split and then placed upon hot coals in a woodstove. I also use oak, beech, hickory and black locust. Good Luck, Jethro-Buckeye
 
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Old 01-17-06, 04:10 AM
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I have some willow that was given to me to burn in my outside sauna. Bad wood. Smells, creates little heat, and smokes to beat the band, this after sitting split for over a year. I use it strictly to idle the fire down if the sauna temp gets too hot. I guess anything will work for kindling but personally I wouldn't use it in my house if I was freezing
 

Last edited by yooperlou; 01-17-06 at 04:25 AM. Reason: still can't spell
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Old 01-17-06, 03:34 PM
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By saying that willow is "great" for firewood, what I meant was "that's about all it's good for". There's obviously many types of wood that are of better quality. As I mentioned, willow is very soft, and as others mentioned, it's a very wet wood that needs to be kept dry. The problem with willow is that if it sits outside and get's rained on, it will soak up water like a sponge even if it was previously "dry". Willow has to be kept dry- in other words, kept under cover. I also believe it's better to leave green wood whole until it's dry enough to burn, rather than splitting it green. Split it just before it's going to be used, because willow seems like it can soak up humidity from the air.
 
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Old 01-18-06, 10:48 AM
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I agree with Xsleeper. That is all it is worth in reality, actually works pretty fine for campfires. In the house though I think the smell more than anything else would drive me nuts. My elm was covered in a lean-to, but split. Maybe things would have been different had we kept it in half log. Either way the smell would still be there
 
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Old 10-20-09, 03:27 PM
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Exclamation

hi i am a firefighter and i have to write an extensive report on oak, willow and fir trees, i have found so much info on oak and willow, but cant find any indo on fir, can someone please lead me into a direction or give some info on fir trees, i had to sign up on this site to post this so please somebody help me

thank you so muchBeer 4U2
 
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Old 10-20-09, 03:30 PM
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Cool

well let me be more specific on what i need, i need to know how it burns...i apoligize for not being specific on that matter:Take One::WH:unish::USAF::PE:
 
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Old 02-18-13, 01:36 PM
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Willow is OK

I have burned many cords of Willow and Weeping Willow in my Elmira stove over the years. Lately people tell me it is unsafe and creates alot of creosite, but I'm not worried about continuing to burn it. It does have to be dried well, but I think it has a lovely fragrance when burned. I have a well built 100 year old chimney - maybe that makes a difference.
 
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Old 02-18-13, 01:45 PM
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Welcome to the forums Elmira!

Do you have your chimney cleaned on a regular basis? That's the only sure fire way to know if you have a creosote problem. I only burn hardwood in my wood stove that's in the house and need to clean the flue every month or so. I'll burn most anything in my shop stove and can go all year and that flue barely needs cleaning. The biggest difference is the shop stove always has a hot fire while the house stove usually has a slow burn.
 
 

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