Fireplace/chimney options for Garage?


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Old 01-23-06, 09:58 AM
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Fireplace/chimney options for Garage?

My 1 car garage [L16xW10xH8] is made of Brick with sheetrocked ceiling and already had a chimney on the roof when we bought the house but I never saw any Duct work or piping of any sort inside that garage so I can't figure out any reason why someone would install a chimney on that small roof?


Right now I am using a Garage Shop Heater fueled by a 20lb Propane tank and seeing that the Chimney or rather the top part of a chimney is there, [by the way, the chimney top that is on the roof is made of metal] I am wondering if I could install a "wood" burning sytem of some sort to heat the Garage in the winter? If so, what would be my best and safest options here? My reason for wanting to use wood is simply because of getting the "natural" feel of a fireplace, thanks.
 
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Old 01-23-06, 10:25 AM
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mikehende, Welcome to the DIY Forums.
I would go on the roof and look down the chimney to see what, if anything, is inside the unit. Also to see if it goes through the roof or is just sitting there for future use. I would also check with your insurance agent on the types of heating appliances they allow.
Where I live, my insurance company allows a built-in fireplace with no inspection or increase in rates. If I install a free standing wood burner, it has to be inspected and a 10% increase in my premiums. Just a thought. Good luck.
 
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Old 01-23-06, 11:13 AM
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Appreciate the response, I had no idea that this involves the Insurance Co. I have seen a lot people in my area who have different types of heat in their garages and none of them have ever mentioned anything about Insurance, does this insurance pertain to "detached" Garages like mine, one also which is 20' away from the house?
 
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Old 01-23-06, 11:21 AM
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the insurance co is going to want to know about any new remodeling you do.
you may need a permit also.
you can do it though, iput a woodburning unit in last year, love it.
 
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Old 01-23-06, 12:24 PM
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How costly is this to get a wood small wood stove and how much does the wood itself cost?
 
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Old 01-23-06, 12:43 PM
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Wood stoves are available in different price ranges. Can even find used ones in the newspaper. Cost of wood depends on the area. Most wood sellers advertise in the newspapers. Make sure you are buying seasoned hardwoods. They will lower the build-up of cresote in the chimney.
Insurance is a funny animal. Thats why I checked when I was THINKING of installing a fireplace. It's what they don't tell you when you sign a policy that can bite you later. I am not good at small print. Detached buildings are better for what you want. Less cost if something happens. Doesn't cost anything to find out though.
 
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Old 01-23-06, 01:05 PM
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I've been doing some more research into the woodstove option over the net and everything I am reading suggests that this would involve a lot "maintenance" compared to my current system but what has me concerned is this article I read about "chimney fire", when using a wood stove, what are the chances of this happening and is there any sure way to prevent it?
 
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Old 01-24-06, 11:29 AM
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One way to avoid a chimney fire has already been mentioned: burn only dry, seasoned hardwoods. Another way is to keep your chimney clean and free of creosote buildup. Cleaning a chimney isn't all that hard; I did it myself when I had my log house which was heated with wood. A few minutes on the roof maybe three times during the heating season was all it took. And the brushes aren't very expensive.
 
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Old 01-24-06, 01:20 PM
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I am a little confused deciding between a wood stove or wood fireplace, what are the differences or pros and cons between the 2 please?
 
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Old 01-29-06, 10:53 AM
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ok, so let me ask another question please. I live in Queens, NY so fireplaces are not that common around here, where can I purchase "seasoned" logs [wood] and how are they sold and cost?
 
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Old 01-29-06, 11:11 AM
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Most sellers of fireplace wood put ads in the newspaper. When I lived in Ohio, I didn't realize how many people sold firewood until I installed a Franklin stove. A fireplace shop may have some info on reputable sellers in your area.
 
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Old 01-29-06, 11:36 AM
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Cool, thanks for the tip, will look into it! Spoke to someone briefy this morning who has a wood fireplace, he said that he uses a special type of wood I believe which is made to burn to clean the chimney usually after every 10th use or so, he said that folks don't have to clean chimneys with brushes anymore, is this correct?
 
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Old 01-29-06, 11:55 AM
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If it were true, there would not be any more chimney sweeps in business. I have also heard of logs and other materials with chemicals in them that REDUCE the build up. In fact, I have been told that sprinkling salt on your logs would do this. I won't say that you will have to clean the flue or chimney every year, but rather, inspect it for build up. Burning seasoned hardwoods is only one way of helping keep build up at a minimum.
 
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Old 01-29-06, 12:46 PM
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Makes sense, another issue, I would like to spend no more than $200 for a fireplace for my Garage, I will need one that can put one at least 32,000 Btu's, looks are not important, I want to be able to see the fire burning but I want be 100% sure that NO cinders or anything can escape to start a fire in the garage, any referrals please? Thanks.
 
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Old 01-29-06, 01:02 PM
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At the price and want you want (seeing the fire) I would think you are more looking at wood stoves than fireplaces. Can't give the BTU ratings as I do not know them. You may find used units in the newspaper.
 
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Old 01-29-06, 01:16 PM
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I still can't get a comparison anywhere on the net between the Stove and the fireplace, if I choose a Stove, would I be able to see the fire burning?
 
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Old 01-29-06, 01:26 PM
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In most cases, stoves are free-standing and fireplaces are built into the wall or structure. My old Franklin stove had glass doors so I could see the fire and a mesh screen which also prevented sparks from coming out of the stove. I also had an electric fan unit that was installed in the flue pipe that took heat from the flue and distributed it into the room. With a good fire, it would run you out of a 15 x 25 room. Only "problem" with the fan unit is it always had to be turned on when I had a fire going so as not to melt the tubes in the blower unit. What I did in the end was replace the in-flue unit with one that sat behind the stove and had about 4" clearance boxed in and a blower motor that took air from under the stove, up along the back and then blew it out across the top of the stove. If I didn't want the blower on, I didn't have to turn it on. This was a problem with the flue unit when the electric went out and I could not use the fireplace for heat.
 
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Old 01-29-06, 01:27 PM
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You really need to check with your insurance company and be very upfront with them on the fact that it is a vehicle garage.
There are often restrictions on having an appliance with an open flame.
Here and a lot of other places the bottom of the appliance, whether wood or otherwise must be a certain distance off the floor.
The minimum distance here is five feet.

It is also not unheard of for people to be unaware of insurance requirements and find out too late they do not have coverage.
 
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Old 01-29-06, 01:52 PM
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Before going to the Insurance Company I want to settle all issues with and decide on an actual appliance type which is why I am looking into angle I can think of right now. One of my friends bought his house in Southern Jersey last year and it came with a fireplace that looks like a Cauldron, his does not have a blower and he says it heats up his entire LR, I will be staying at his house for a weekend in 5 weeks from now so I will scrutinize his setup closely and try to get one like he has.

The only real concern I have is that there is a tree over my garage roof and have to wonder if the smoke coming out of the chimney top might ignite the dry leaves in the Fall?
 
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Old 01-29-06, 02:00 PM
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It is good to know what you want before trying to find out what you can or cannot do. I have always had spark arrestor caps on my fireplaces and wood stove chimneys. I still would not have a limb hanging over my chimney though.
 
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Old 01-29-06, 02:12 PM
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It's a good thing I had asked this question so now just for added security, I will get the "Spark arrestor caps" you mentioned even if there isn't any branches over my Garage [thanks].

The problem here is that the tree that is hanging over my Garage is in the neighbor's yard, I will have to talk to him [he is a retired Detective] to find out if I can cut the limbs located over my Garage, I don't how this works where the law is concerned, if a neigbor has an apple tree and a branch is hanging over your property, does the apples on that branch belong to you?
 
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Old 01-29-06, 07:33 PM
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Fireplace/chimney options for Garage?

The apples may belong to him, but he would have to get your permission to pick them unless he wanted to climb out on the limb from his side.

Dick
 
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Old 01-30-06, 05:37 AM
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A friend of mine who lives a few blocks away from me decided one day to cut the branches from a neighbor's tall tree whose branches was over his swimming pool as he had to constantly keep removing the leaves falling off those branches into the pool. Mistake he made, he did not ask the neighbor if he can cut the branches, the neighbor with whom he had always had a very good relationship was upset and this damaged their relationship from then on.
 
 

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