wood stove clearance


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Old 01-09-07, 07:14 PM
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wood stove clearance

I have a wood stove I want to put in a corner, it says it needs something like 20 inches of clearance from walls, I was wondering if there is anything I could use ( something flame resistant ) to cut down on the clearance
 
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Old 01-10-07, 06:58 AM
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If the wall is masonary you can cut the distance down, using tile may let you get closer to the wall. My stove is in a corner but the back is 22" from the wall [pipe is closer] and the end is 18" I think 18" was the spec from the factory.

A wood stove can put out a lot of heat which will transfer to the wall. I've heard of a double wall system that can be used but that is the extent of my knowldege about it.

I doubt a fire resistant paint would be of much help. Basically what they do is to 'melt' and smother the flames in case of fire.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 06:35 PM
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You need to check with the manufacturer of the stove, each type/model will have it's own approved clearances for all installation options. Clearences will change depending on where and how it is installed, and if you use single or double wall pipe, and if the closest wall surfaces are combustible or not. We had our stove installed last year (Jotul) and clearences varied by 8-10" depending on the options. Also, for it to be considered a "non-combustible" surface, which cut the clearance by 8" for our stove, there had to be a 1 inch air gap between the sheet rock wall and the non-combustible material, cultured stone in our case.
This was easily done by mounting a 4x8 sheet of cement board to the wall directly behind the stove using 1" spacers to have a gap bewteen the two, as well as having a 1" gap between the floor and the bottom of the cement board and the ceiling and cement board. Cultured stone, or whatever you want to use, was applied to the cement board. This was what was required by code in our region and allows air to circulate and not coduct too much direct heat. This reduced our clearance from 14" to 8".
 
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Old 01-13-07, 04:34 AM
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O.K thanks for the advice. The stove I picked up needs 18" from the corners to the adjacent walls. I checked out a Regency model and they can be within 4 to 6 inches, they are also quite a bit more expensive.
 
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Old 01-13-07, 08:40 AM
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Just had a wood stove installed and it's a clearance from a combustable material. The stove is 16" from the wall (wood) but then we can put hardibacker and ceramic tile on top of that without an issue.

You can get closer with special isolated airgap walls, but our installer said they are pretty complicated and need to be done at home construction time; retrofits are a pain.

For inspection, we just have to comply with the manufacturer's install instructions - yes the inspector will come out, look at the instructions, look at the installation and say "yup, you followed the instructions - pass!"

Enjoy your stove! We LOVE ours. The cats love it even more ;-)
 
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Old 01-13-07, 09:10 AM
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Wink

I find that the best bet for what you need there is to check code there first. If its not to code your insurance wont cover your home.
 
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Old 01-17-07, 02:26 PM
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wood stove clearance helped by cultured stone and double sheet rock above

My Jotul Castine stove is in the basement in the corner. I building a stone raised hearth 8 inches above the concrete floor, installed cultured ledgestone to the block wall 20" behind the stove. I found the cultured stone does a fairly good job of radianting off the heat when the stove cools down. The iling is 2 feet above the stove pipe and I doubled up the drywall on the ceiling directly above the stove. In another DIY forum, I was helped by Airman when he suggested running my forced air system on fan only to help circulate the 85 degree air in the basement throught the entire house. After about one hour, the temp upstairs was 72 while the downstairs temps dropped to 78.

Good Luck,JB
 
 

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