Is Persimmon Safe in a Wood Stove?


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Old 03-03-08, 04:35 PM
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Is Persimmon Safe in a Wood Stove?

I've heard Persimmon can mess up your flue when burnt in a wood stove. Any other first hand experiences? It will be seasoned 10 months.

Bobcat
 
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Old 03-03-08, 08:02 PM
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Hi bob,

This is my first post to this tread but I know a little about wood stoves. The damage to the chimney is caused by 1) creosote and 2) heat.

Creosote is the solids caused by either burning the wood 1) with a low heat or 2) excess moisture or sap. The solids do not get converted into heat energy and are light enough to rise with the heat.

As it leaves the firebox and enters the chinmey it begins to cool. it either collects on the side of the chimney or falls back down. Creosote ususally collects on non-effecient surfaces, like a sheet metal screw securing 2 pieces of black pipe. The wood stoves with catalyetic converters (like your cars exhaust system). It is a honey combed metal that is heated by the fire. The solids collect on the honey comb (instead of rising into the chimney) where it gets burned off (turn into heat energy).

The other damage (less common) is excessive heat. As you know, heat causes everything to expand. Now most modern chimneys are designed to accept this higher heat. But sometimes (old chimneys, excessive heat over time etc) causes the chimney to sparate or expand beyond its tensile strength. Thus an unsafe chimney.

Newer chimneys are designed to have a fire started in the chimney (chimney fire) and still perform correctly.

I do not know much about th wood you are burning but in Michigan we use a lot of Jack Pine that is sappy as all get out. The key is to have the wood dry (less than 20% H2O). This is done by cutting into small pieces and splitting them. Still there is some solids that are left behind in the wood. So to counter that, we use Oak to get the fire nice and hot around 400F. Then we add the pine. Any solids that escape the wood are certainly to get burned off before it leaves the firebox. If the fire is too low, and without a catalytic converter, the solids rise into the chimney.

So the answer is sappy wood needs to be dried to less than 20% and it needs to be burned hot 400F. But not too hot (over 600F)

Make since?
 
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Old 03-04-08, 03:35 AM
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I've never burnt persimmon, but it is a hard wood, and usually, it is acceptable to burn any seasoned, hard wood. It is likely to contain insects that will cause sparking, though.(Pine, however, is a soft wood !)
 
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Old 03-04-08, 01:11 PM
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The key word in this entire conversation is "seasoned". And this cannot be done accurately by just saying "it has been split for XX months". Some hardwoods take a full year in near perfect conditions to season.

The only, I mean only, way to determine if a wood is seasoned is to measure the moisture. This can be accomplished with a simple moisture meter with some degree of accuracy. I have found that these meters are within +/-3%. The goal is to get the H2O content below 20% and preferabbly below 15%. At 10% any wood burns by the touch of a match...hense "matchlight".
 
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Old 03-04-08, 01:17 PM
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The problem with Pine is that the sap retains so much moisture and it is difficult to season. Many people here in MI burn Pine regularly and I have seen many chimney fires because of creosote build up. People do not take the time to properly measure the H2O in wood, to the extend of a death by fire. Creosote is a nasty, nasty by-product of the burning process, along with other carcinogens. The less creosote the better. I dont care if the chimney is cleaned every year, i do not take chances.
 
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Old 03-05-08, 04:16 PM
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Let me be more precise in my query. I was warned SPECIFICALLY about Persimmon as to it's unusual creosote production. Is there anyone that can comment SPECIFICALLY to Persimmon? Side note: I have been cutting and burning wood for 30 years and am familiar with most every variety indigenous to this area. I wouldn't attempt to burn Pine or Popular in a Stove. I usually try to mix types and have very little creosote produced.

Thanks for all Responses
Bobcat
 
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Old 03-05-08, 04:23 PM
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Red face

Sorry, that was the best I could do...nobody WANTS to burn persimmon. I found lots of articles about using it, but not burning it. I didn't mean to insinuate you didn't know what you're doing.
 
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Old 03-05-08, 05:09 PM
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Check out energy values of hardwood here: http://www.demesne.info/Garden-Help/...ewood-hard.htm

Persimmon is supposed to be an excellent firewood.
 
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Old 03-05-08, 05:17 PM
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Thanks, Twelvepole !
 
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Old 03-07-08, 09:22 AM
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Excellent!

Thanks for that list. That's the most complete I've seen.


Bobcat
 
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Old 12-27-09, 10:44 AM
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persimmon wood

Originally Posted by Bobcattoo View Post
Thanks for that list. That's the most complete I've seen.


Bobcat
i burned some persimmon for a week and had a bad experience.i was starting my morning wood stove with some shredded newspaper and had a quick chimney fire.i figure the persimmon is too gummy even though its 10 months old.i took a piece outside and split it,and sure enough its still wet when you put your cheek to the wood.lots of gummy train tracks inside the wood.it scared me and i, ve been burning with woodstoves for 25 years.regards jim m
 
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Old 12-27-09, 01:01 PM
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Hardwoods should ideally be cut and split for two years before burning. Not much more than 15% moister present as well. Most homeowners dont have a moister meter, so the top recommendation is generally best.
 
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Old 12-28-09, 05:09 AM
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Update

Well, I actually burnt the Persimmon that was blown down in Feb. 08 last Winter. No problems noticed. Mixed it with other hardwoods and could see no ill effects. Can't guarantee others experiences.
 
 

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