wood stove in basement?


  #1  
Old 07-29-08, 12:35 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Ohio, USA
Posts: 46
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
wood stove in basement?

I have a 1200 square foot ranch with a full basement. With rising natural gas costs (10.65/mcf to 15.96/mcf) I was considering putting in a wood stove.

My questions is this...If I put the stove in the basement would enough heat make it to the main floor? The stove is rated at 48000btu.
 
  #2  
Old 07-31-08, 09:43 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 42
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dc101 View Post
I have a 1200 square foot ranch with a full basement. With rising natural gas costs (10.65/mcf to 15.96/mcf) I was considering putting in a wood stove.

My questions is this...If I put the stove in the basement would enough heat make it to the main floor? The stove is rated at 48000btu.
How would the heat get upstairs? Is your basement ceiling insulated and finished? Do you have any vents by which the warm air in the basement could rise into the upstairs?
Do you plan for natural convection via vents and stairways, or conduction of the heat through the floor, or do you plan to install ductwork to get the heat upstairs?
You also don't say where you live and what the winter climate may be. 48K BTU is not alot of heat for some places.
Nevertheless, any heat you add to the structure will help but it's not clear how much with info you have given.
 
  #3  
Old 07-31-08, 01:51 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Ohio, USA
Posts: 46
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by barkleydoggy View Post
How would the heat get upstairs? Is your basement ceiling insulated and finished? Do you have any vents by which the warm air in the basement could rise into the upstairs?
Do you plan for natural convection via vents and stairways, or conduction of the heat through the floor, or do you plan to install ductwork to get the heat upstairs?
You also don't say where you live and what the winter climate may be. 48K BTU is not alot of heat for some places.
Nevertheless, any heat you add to the structure will help but it's not clear how much with info you have given.
Half the basement is finished half is not. No insulation in the ceiling.

I could cut floor vents on the unfinished side and on the finished side I can put ceiling vents in and attach pipe from them to floor vents upstairs.

I live in NE ohio.
 
  #4  
Old 07-31-08, 02:28 PM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,197
Received 53 Votes on 49 Posts
There are strict rules about the installation of wood burning appliances.

The business of installing ducts to move heat generated by a wood burner could violate building codes.
Many folks build contraptions to capture heat off wood burners but would get a nasty surprise if they ever had to make an insurance claim.

You would do well to go to a specialty store that sells wood burning heaters over a box store as you may get better information.
Also, you would have to inform your insurer to see what their requirements are and how much the surcharge on your insurance would be.
 
  #5  
Old 08-01-08, 04:03 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Consider purchasing a plenum heater. I have one in my basement, and use it regularly when the temps go really low. It is fan forced, has a plenum chamber mounted on top with an 8" take off that passes a damper and then into my duct system. The door is like an air lock, so it is not like a regular fireplace, or stove. Not sure what Greg is talking about with the insurance matters, but adapting a regular stove would really not be a good idea. This one is made to be installed in that manner. With the damper closed it keeps normally heated or cooled air from the heat pump from backing through it unnecessarily.
 
  #6  
Old 02-07-14, 10:40 AM
V
Member
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
dc101: I am confused, I lived in a 1200sf ranch & my cellar was always fairly warm. While my cellar was not finished, I had my washer & dryer down there & could go downstairs with just my socks on my feet. Do you have a furnace down there? The heat from that plus running thru your ducts throughout your ceiling should provide heat. If I were to make my cellar as another living space (it had been a thought) I would have probably just purchased a nice elect. fireplace or (if I had natural gas) a gas one & that would have been enough to provide the little bit of extra heat needed should I be using as a living area & sitting down there for longer periods of time. However, there were many times when I was down there for awhile going thru stored away items as well & had no problems. Oh, did I mention I am a person who is generally always cold!
 
  #7  
Old 02-07-14, 04:08 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 183
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I have a stove in my basement. 2000sf house 2 story. I run it non stop from November till april. About 15 fce cords. The basement is 90 plus degrees sometimes, my floors are always warm and I get some radiating heat through them. I have a few vents cut in the floor and run a fan at the bottom of the stairs and in the open door to the basement. From 20 to 40 degrees degrees it can keep up fair with heating the house to about mid to upper 60's below 20 degrees even feeding it non stop it can barely keep up. That said my heat is set to 64 and my fuel bill was cut by over 65% and I live in cold norther NY. I went from burning 3 plus tanks of oil to just over 1 tank of oil. I heat my DHW with the boiler too. It is an excellent supplement, but will not heat the house like you need it to .
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: