removing fireplace wall

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  #1  
Old 04-09-00, 01:51 PM
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I would like to remove the interior wall of my fireplace and would like to know the best way. I live in the south where it is only cold enough for a fireplace a few days a year, even though it is still very common to build them as the focal point of our living rooms. I would prefer to use this area as an entertainment alcove, where the TV can be placed, leaving most of the firplace brick exposed as architectural interest. Since I cannot completely remove the chimney visible from the outside, due to our townhouse rules, I want to know how to remove the interior of the three walls.
 
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Old 04-23-00, 07:28 PM
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Please tell us more about what your fireplace looks like.

------------------
Plumb & Level Masonry

Check out some of our custom built Fireplaces at: http://www.rumford.com/McNearpictures.html
 
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Old 04-25-00, 07:01 PM
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The fireplace looks like one of the kits used in many homes. It has a cultured marble-looking mantle and is completly sheetrocked from the mantle through the second floor. It is on the outside of the house and the exterior is brick. It has never been used in it's 17 years of being there.
 
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Old 04-25-00, 07:22 PM
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I would also like to remove my firepalce.

I live in the northwest (seattle area) and would like to free up the sapce instead to use as a counter.

The fireplace is approx. 34"x58" & from below the first floor (from the basement) to ceiling, in the middle of the room.

bricks are 11 1/2" x 1 1/2" (face) by approx. 3" deep.

built in the late 50's.

there are supporting columns on 2 sides NEXT to the fireplace and other columns apprx. 60" away.
could the morter have been mixed with asbestos?
 
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Old 06-09-00, 09:24 AM
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Hello,

I live in London and I am also removing my fireplaces. One from the front, which goes through the house and one at the back.

Regardless of internal / external stacks, you must understand the loads and pressures that are applied to walls so that you can appreciate how good a job a lintel does.

This is how you should attempt to remove an internal chimney stack (I don't know how to do externally built ones, sorry);

First go into the loft and check how the bricks come through the ceiling and up to the roof. if your beams flow with the wall that the chimney is on then you will need to install two lintels. One on each side of the chimney wall.

If the beams go against the wall with the chimney on then you can add a lintel that props itels along ATLEAST three of the beams.

Make sure you create two holes and use a couple of needles and props to keep the rest of the chimney and roof from falling all around you!

Once you have installed the lintels and secured them in with weatherproof cement, you can start removing the bricks.

Start at the top of the house and work your way down making sure that you are careful around each ceiling area. If the beams for the ceilings utilise the chimney stack, you will need to replace these. Use the same technique for installing the lintels as you did at the top of the house.

Once you have removed all the bricks from both floors, you've now got a very dusty and sooty two floors. Wipe down the walls with soapy water and add a sealant to the bare walls.

Next apply a couple of coats of universal sealant to waterproof the walls. Then plaster and paint.

Hope this helps.
 
 

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