fractured fireplace

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  #1  
Old 05-24-00, 04:14 AM
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I rent an old limestone house and just before I moved in, my landlady patched the interior rear wall of the fireplace as the limestone was frittering away and painted all surfaces white. A chimney sweep was called in and as all seemed fine, I lit a fire on the first chilly evening. It looked wonderful and drew beautifully but the smell of blistering plastic paint was vile. As well the plaster or whatever material used for patching, crazed badly. Should I chip as much of this away as I can and repair with refactory cement (and get a grate!) or, as my friends suggest, buy a thick rug and a radiator?
 
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Old 05-24-00, 10:18 AM
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Hienny Rosey

Anytime there is a fracture/crack anywhere's in an old firplace, there is alway's a danger of some sort.

If the owner will not correctly fix the fireplace, which may mean it be totally replaced, I would also highly suggest it not be used.

Based solely on what you posted here and not seeing the condition, it's difficult to say exactly what damger or dangers exit.

However, consider the possiblity of carbon monoxides entering the house and also a total collapse of the structure as extreme possibilities.

Be Carefull and Good Luck
TomBartco
Energy Technician and Consultant
 
  #3  
Old 05-26-00, 02:58 PM
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The above advise is right on target.

Safety becomes the number one issue.

Focus centers on the fireplace that usually means there is possible problems further up chimmey too.

The best long term fix is a metal insert but since it is rental there is that consideration of cost.

Don't just think fireplace, think overall system all the way up. I really don't put faith in cursory inspections, just to much you never can see.
 
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Old 05-28-00, 08:50 PM
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Thank you Tom for your advice. As an absolute novice at DIY projects, I was unaware of possible dangers eg carbon monoxide poisoning. How would that occur - ie if there are cracks (or in my case two 2cm holes in the rear wall of the hearth)wouldn't the smoke still go up the chimney?
Gratefully (no pun),
Denny
 
  #5  
Old 06-12-00, 04:55 PM
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Perhaps the metal pipe relinig is NOT the best long term solution as suggested. A better possibility is the use of a cast refractory relining and restructuring of the smokechamber and replacement of the firebox. This fireplace could be repaired using these materials and efforts to meet modern code requirements. See: www.centalmichimney.qpg.com for details.
 
 

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