Pellet stove in the basement, anyway to get the heat upstairs


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Old 09-27-09, 05:16 PM
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Pellet stove in the basement, anyway to get the heat upstairs

I cant seem to get the heat upstairs. Does anyone have a new way to do so? Ive tried all kinds of things with leaving the door open or closing it, with or without fans, using the ceiling fans and I havent been able to get the heat upstairs and it seems like the pellet stove was a waste of money. Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 09-27-09, 05:37 PM
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If you have a return in the basement turn your fan to on and let in ride.
 
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Old 09-27-09, 05:42 PM
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No return in the basement. The return is on the main floor in our rancher. I tried using the fan method but it seemed to actually make the house colder. thanks again
 
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Old 09-27-09, 07:12 PM
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This is a common problem.

Hopefully you have notified your house insurance company and have your pellet stove listed in your policy.
You can not alter your home or ductwork to move the heat from your wood burner without affecting your insurance policy.
Any changes you make to move the heat upstairs would void your policy because it could cause a fire to spread faster.

You really need an approved wood burning furnace to get the heat out of the basement.
 
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Old 09-30-09, 03:05 PM
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Using the heat pump to circulate the air... Let me layout the house alittle to explain a thought I have. I have a rancher and the unit is in the attic with vents and the return on the main floor. There is one vent down to the basement. I have no return in the basement but the return on the main floor and the vent in the basement are very close to each other. What if I were to get the vent and return switched for the winter. That means switch the actual ductwork on the unit so that the return is the vent in the basment and the old return on the main floor becomes another vent. Would this help? Also what would happen if the pellet stove wasnt running and the return in the basement was pulling 60 degree air up to the unit? Thanks again.
 
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Old 09-30-09, 03:41 PM
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Ok, I'll try to explain it another way.

Yes, if you were to reverse the supply and return in the bsmt you would move more of the heat from the pellet stove throughout the rest of your home.
But, if you do so and have a fire you likely will have voided your insurance policy by doing so.
This is an area that adjusters are more than aware of.

You also have to keep in mind that if you were to move the heat to more of your house you will burn considerably more pellets.
I am unsure of your area but pellet prices that I am aware of are not competitive with the cost of conventional energy.
IOW depending where you are it could cost more to heat your whole house with pellets than what your normal energy source would cost.
 
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Old 09-30-09, 04:25 PM
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Thanks for the info. I did contact my insurance company and they did have the pellet stove listed but Im not sure if the movement would be covered. I could ask them and see what they say. As for pellets, last year I paid like $3 to $4 for a 40lb bag. It seems like they might be alittle higher this year. Im trying to come up with ideas because a few months last year, my electric bill was between $200 and $300 a month and that seems high for a rancher where nobody is home during the day. THanks again for the input and any more suggestions are greatly welcomed.
 
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Old 10-07-09, 08:21 PM
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Pellet stoves are basically space heaters but can do a good job heating the house if you have an open floor plan. If you basement is not finished then you are loosing a lot of heat in the walls.

A good place for help for this would be Hearth.com - Information on Gas Fireplaces, Wood Stoves, Gas Logs, Pellet Stoves, Fireplaces, Chimneys and Hearth Products and navigating to the The Pellet Mill and Corn Crib forum.
 
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Old 10-10-09, 02:30 PM
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Hello - A friend told me that he has a pellet stove in the basement of a cottage he bought. When he tried it, the windows in the basement got condensation and the pellet stove did not heat the house much at all. Then he finally found that pellet stoves need fresh air for the fire to work properlly. Giving it fresh air fixed the problem and his house is warm as toast now! Also there is no insulation in the basement ceiling. That makes a big difference!
 
 

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