How can I remove a piece of ducting that goes into the brick?

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Old 10-05-09, 02:35 PM
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How can I remove a piece of ducting that goes into the brick?

Hello,

I have a stand alone wood burning fireplace in my basement. The duct work that goes from the fireplace to the chimney needs to be replaced. I have everything all setup but when I went to insert one of the pieces I found that a very rusted piece of metal had broken on something that has been there for a while.

It needs to be replaced as well, but I don't know exactly how to remove it. It seems a little tricky in my mind and I am worried that I could damage something.

Here are some nifty pictures.

 
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Old 10-05-09, 02:55 PM
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Just collapse it and peel it out. It is just a reducer fitting from the chimney opening size to the stove outlet size. The replacement may look a bit different, either a conical shape or a bushing shape but it will do the same thing.

If the replacement fits too loosely use some furnace cement to "glue" it in place. Furnace cement is available at old time hardware stores and fireplace shops. Some big box homecenters will also carry it.
 
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Old 10-05-09, 03:06 PM
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I agree with Furd. Underneath it is most likely a terra cotta nipple that ties in with the flue pipe. So be careful not to crack it. The black pipe is just stubborn. IMO you should use no less than 20 gauge seamless steel back in this application.
 
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Old 10-06-09, 12:28 PM
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In the words of the most excellent, fantastic, sexy gw bush, 'Mission accomplished'.





I like to use cardboard to get the draft going as cardboard burns incredibly hot, smoke went all over but it subsided. After a few moments, I got a good fire going and then plenty of smoke started pouring from some portion near the base. I was sure there was a leak or something broke. I thought about going to get a fire extinguisher or a bucket of water to get rid of the fire when I realized the freakin sticker on one of the tubes wasn't taking too kindly to the heat. Whatever was burning (probably toxic glue) went away, nad nw i dun th1k s0 gewd.

Thanks you two.

In case anyone was curious, first I sprayed some wd-40 like stuff around the corners and followed it up with 2 or 3 good rounds of stainless steel brushing. Then I pushed from the bottom left and right over and over, upwards. It sort of gradually shook it loose.
 
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Old 10-06-09, 01:13 PM
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This is just my opinion..but that looks about as safe as a longtailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs...

What kind of duct did you use? How'd you seal the joints?
 
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Old 10-06-09, 05:45 PM
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I sealed them the same way they were sealed when they were put together when I found them. I am sure someone here is going to write out a nice long rant about the dangers of what I am doing and how I am disregarding -my- life and -my- property concerning the fact that I should be using the methods recommended by some hand book created by the corporations that manufacture the products that the book tells you to buy.

Essentially gravity does the work. They have crimped edges at one end, each one fits into the one next to it, pretend they are legos. Unless we start having earth quakes in northern Wisconsin I feel pretty confident about the placement of most things in my home.
 
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Old 10-06-09, 05:45 PM
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Curiouser, too.....is that HVAC duct? Certainly doesn't look like flue pipe.
 
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Old 10-06-09, 06:01 PM
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Pinjas...wasn't attacking...just making an observation from what I saw...

Just because you did it the way it was...doesn't mean it was done right.
 
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Old 10-06-09, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
Pinjas...wasn't attacking...just making an observation from what I saw...

Just because you did it the way it was...doesn't mean it was done right.
I wasn't implying or stating that you were attacking. I think I have had at least two threads closed because of what I said. Unsafe, no permit, mass murderer et cetera.

I went to menards and bought the same pipes that were on the setup previously (These might be a thicker gauge). The way I understand it is the heat creates a sort of vacuum. It is almost like momentum. The heat rises and continues to do so, dragging everything it can with it.
 
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