filling in a hole in my old chimney


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Old 12-13-09, 02:14 PM
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filling in a hole in my old chimney

I bought a 75 year old house several months ago and have been in the process of renovating it. I'm currently repairing the walls in my kitchen, and have decided to tackle this problem:



Thats my chimney in the kitchen on the first floor, it's been plastered over and wallpapered and such. It appears something used to vent into the chimney, was removed, and some sort of cylindrical metal plug had been inserted into the hole. It had been plastered around the circumference of the hole.

I was told by a general contractor that I could just hammer the plug back so it was flush and mud over it. I did just that, and broke a bunch of the plaster off and now the plug is loose. There's a bit of space at the top between the metal plug and the chimney brick.

Can someone tell me how I should go about plugging this hole so I can fill in over it and make it look like it was never there? Like most, I don't really want to spend much, but I don't want to do a crappy job either.

info about the chimney: it's a 75 year old house and is made out of some sort of brick. The water heater and furnace (both decades old) are in the basement and are the only things that vent into the chimney. I'm unaware if it has any sort of lining, but I'm guessing it probably doesn't.


edit: secondary questions: is there any problem with mudding directly over the exposed brick with joint compound? I understand there's supposed to be a 2" gap between the chimney and stuff around it.....but that's been pretty well violated already
 
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Old 12-16-09, 06:30 PM
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Something I would be curious about is hot this chimney is being used, merely to vent your gas fired hot water heater and possibly furnace, or if you are also using this in conjunction with a fireplace that is only a few feet from this bung? The temperature differences of a venting hot water heater in the basement 20 feet below and a fireplace right below the opening can be mery different, and so can the vnting needs of both.
 
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Old 12-17-09, 07:26 AM
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There is no fireplace in the house. The gas water heater & furnace (about 15' below the hole) are the only things that vent into the chimney. There's no plans for a fireplace, while I live in the house at the least
 
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Old 12-18-09, 02:31 PM
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You can just yank that plug out to see if there is a liner or not. If there is, that should alleviate any fears of flue gas coming out of that hole. It will also help isolate some of the heat.

I would use high heat furnace cement to seal around the plug. You can get that from Home Depot or Lowes. Give it a long time to set. It will shrink and can crack if there is a lot of it applied. That happened to me when my boiler was replaced. I just added more to fill in the cracks. After that I would apply whatever finish coat you desire. Drywall compound will shrink and crack when applied too thick as well. Ready Patch may be a better fit for this application.

You need to keep combustible materials 2" away form a chimney. Metal and plaster are not combustible.
 
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Old 12-20-09, 07:10 AM
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hole in chimney

From looking at the picture & the fact that the house is 75 yrs old and the chimney is in the kitchen tells me this could have been where a cook stove was . They may have had to take it out because of the gas unit below.In my dealings with the Fire Marshal I am to the understanding that you can have several units hooked up to the same chimney providing the chimney is large enough to withstand the volume of emissions and they must be in the proper order. They could have changed this . Different regions may have varying regulations. There should be a metal sleeve or a thimble as we call it where the old stove pipe attached to the chimney . The thimble is usually bricked & mortared in . The plug should come out fairly easy . If there is no thimble ( as there may not be) get some cheap bricks & Patch up the hole . If there is , try to get it out if you can . If you can't , brick in the hole & parge it up good , then do your finishing touches. I would not leave the plug in & cover it. Your just putting a band-aid over the problem. The plug may just be a thin piece of metal , fabricated , like a band-aid to fit inside the thimble. There may or may not be a liner inside the chimney . Sometimes back then , they just parged the inside Ive run across many older homes like this . Once you take out this plug you'll be able to see inside at whats going on here. I hope this helps you
 
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Old 12-22-09, 09:18 AM
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It doesn't look like there's a liner behind the plug, and there isn't any thimble. Looks like I'll be patching up the hole with brick, thanks for the advice.

Any specific type of brick and mortar? Are there any tricks to cutting the brick to shape?

Thanks for the help
 
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Old 12-22-09, 05:54 PM
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hole in chimney

You can buy the mortar @ Lowes or Home Depot , there small bags ,just add water . Don't make it too wet as it'll be harder to work with .Type S or N it doesn't matter here . To cut the brick , if you don't have a brick hammer just use a claw hammer & chisel and do the best you can with it. When pointing it up , if you don't have a pointing trowel just get an old butter knife & bend it just a little at the tip so there's a slight bend in the blade . I make these myself for pointing up stone as I don't like the ones you buy in the store.Make sure there's no holes and it's solid then you can do the finishing touches after. You'll have fun DON'T USE A GOOD BUTTER KNIFE
 
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Old 12-30-09, 05:12 PM
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Thanks for the advice, I used a $5 harbor freight chisel to shape a $1.20 brick from lowes and mortared them in where the plug used to be. I used a putty scraper instead of an old putty knife, which worked ok.

My arm is going to be sore from all the chiseling, but I think it turned out ok. Now I just have to find a use for the remaining 59 lbs of mortar in my basement
 
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Old 05-02-12, 07:04 AM
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Cool my experience filling hole little over 6x6 big -

Hey, everyone i had to respond to this thread cause this hole bothered me so much until i finally devised the perfect plan....!!!!!!!!

SO, i went to home depot and got a bottle of tuff stuff crack and gap filling insulation.......it is the fire proof bottle there are at least different bottles.....it sprays out orange insulation......

vacuumed out the hole....

sprayed the insulation in two seperate layers.......spray half way and then fill in gaps on the next spray....but dont forget that the insulation expands to at least 50 % bigger then what it comes out as.....

gave my self at 4" of space from insultion to wall level.........

the insulation comes out circular so i gaved a sharp knife and cut the foam as flat as i could.....let dry first hole should be air tight right now.........actually its better that air tight ...!!!!!!!!!!

then i put a thin layer of joint compound on the insulation...while wet grap two paint sticks the big ones for 5 gallon mixing.......and cut them to the size of the hole and make and "X" and nail them into the insulation......

after the thin layer with the paint stick X drys(about 4-8 hours is what i did could be sooner was very humid and rainy out when i did it)....add another layer a little thicker this time let dry over night.....keep adding thin layers until hole is almost level then add the drywall patch.....ALLLLLLLLLL done
 
 

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