Is it Okay/Safe To Run a Vent Free Stove 24/7


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Old 01-10-10, 08:19 AM
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Is it Okay/Safe To Run a Vent Free Stove 24/7

Last week I bought a 25,000 BTU Black Vent-Free Gas Stove. My house is about 900 sq. ft. It says it should heat 1,000 sq. ft.
It heats great and I've been running it for a week now. The whole house stays warm, not hot. It sure has helped in this frigid weather we're having. It was below 0 last night.

Anyway, the stove is in the living room about 8 ft. from the furnace thermostat. The thermostat reads around 75 degrees since I've been running the new gas stove so the furnace never comes on as I have it set to come on at 65 degrees.

I read where you shouldn't use a vent free stove as your only source of heat. I don't know why. Does that mean it's not safe or something to run it all the time? Or does that mean you shouldn't install this stove without installing a furnace too?
Is it okay or safe to run the stove 24/7 without the furnace coming on at all?

I haven't had any problems with excess moisture as this is a drafty old house.
Thanks for any help you can give me.
 
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Old 01-10-10, 08:46 AM
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It's not the moisture to be concerned with. It's the carbon monoxide that you need to be concerned with. If I were you I'd get a carbon monoxide detector and install it. One of the pros should be along to give any other advice.
 
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Old 01-10-10, 09:26 AM
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Been using one for 62 years and not dead yet and have no furnace. Of course you can't go crazy and seal up all the cracks and drafts. You want a good air flow. A CO detector is a good safety item. The real problem is modern houses are built too air tight for ventless heaters. Might want to open a couple of windows a bit.
 
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Old 01-10-10, 10:27 AM
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Hi Dawter,
If you are going for a CO alarm, consider one with a display. Knowing the level allows you to relate the use of the heater to the corresponding rise in CO and a better indication of pending problems, not just an alarm that you need to get out of the house.
Example: Amazon.com: Kidde 900-0234 NightHawk Carbon Monoxide Alarm, Long Life AC Powered with Battery Backup and Digital Display: Home Improvement

Also, here is a county health alert with some advice on CO.
Carbon Dioxide compared to Carbon Monoxide

Bud
 
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Old 01-10-10, 01:08 PM
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Thanks for your help. I'll take a look at the CO alarm that you mentioned.
Not sure why Crazycorry said not to be concerned with moisture.(?)
 
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Old 01-10-10, 01:58 PM
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I think CC was saying the moisture is the least of the problems. That the CO can kill you.

Bud
 
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Old 01-10-10, 02:42 PM
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A good CO detector is a good idea if you have any gas appliance.

Vent free gas fireplaces are a very economical source of heat, but are not intended to be your primary source of heat. Since you do have another source of heat, you should be OK, but I am not a fan of running them 24/7.

They produce a quart of moisture per hour and in areas where the houses must be tightly sealed and do not "breathe", that moisture stays in the house and can cause mold issues. Here in the South East, the humidity levels are as high as 95% in the Summer and in the 20% in the Winter, so we need the extra moisture.

They also produce carbon dixoide, which humans exhale and plants take in to make oxygen. If you have lots of plants they will love the moist air and the CO2. Like anything, too much of a good thing is not a good thing and the same goes for CO2.

Hope this helps clear the air. :-)
 
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Old 01-10-10, 03:12 PM
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Ive got a vent free LP log from home depot.
I run it constant when the Heat pump cant keep up.
when it drops below 20ish the gas logs keep the house warm.
I have a CO detector. always reads zero.
O2 depletion is more of a concern.
I check the CO detector occiasionally with the LP forced air garage heater to make sure it still picks up CO. It usually perks up around 80 ppm on that heater.
 
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Old 01-10-10, 03:47 PM
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This house is very drafty. I can see all around the edges of the front and back doors. I tried putting up weatherstripping but no matter how thin I got it then the doors wouldn't close. I'm getting 2 new doors as soon as it warms up a bit.
I don't mind the small gaps around the doors as it lets in some fresh air. (It's not gushing in or anything). LOL
If I were to use my furnace and not use this as the primary source of heat- why buy the stove?
Like I said, the thermostat on the furnace is set at 65 degrees. With this stove running as low as it will go the temperature on the wall reads 77 degrees at the least.
I'd have to turn the stove off, let the house get down to 65 degrees so the furnace would kick on. Why would I want to do that? I'm not understanding.
 
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Old 01-17-10, 02:20 AM
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I have another question.
This stove has a thermostat. It has never shut off yet as I have it turned low. Will the pilot flame still be visible when the stove kicks off or does everything go off?
I'd think the pilot flame would have to stay on so the stove could kick on again but I don't know.
Thank you.
 
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Old 01-17-10, 04:54 AM
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The thermostat only controls gas flow to the main burners not the pilot. Your pilot should stay lit when the thermostat turns off the main burners. If the pilot ever does go out, there is a safety sensor that will shut off gas within 30-45 seconds.
 
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Old 01-17-10, 07:21 AM
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Thank you for helping me.
 
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Old 02-20-10, 01:58 PM
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The gas stove is working good! Now, where is the black soot-like stuff that's on the inside of my windows coming from? I'm assuming the stove, but is this a natural thing?
Thanks again!
 
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Old 02-20-10, 03:55 PM
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It could be from improper log placement, improperly adjusted gas pressure, clogged orfices......or many other things. Vent free gas fireplaces, for this reason, are not DIY appliances. Call a professional to evaluate your fireplace.

The moisture will attach to airborne dust particles and condense on your cooler windows. When the moisture evaporates, it leaves behind that dust and a haze on your window.

Please call in a professional, there is possibly a dangerous situation happening with your gas stove.
 
 

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