Reducing Wood Stove Clearance


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Old 10-21-11, 04:44 AM
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Reducing Wood Stove Clearance

Installing a wood stove in my log home. I want to minimize the clearance from the combustible wall. The information I'm finding on the web talks about using asbestos millboard. Can you even buy that stuff anymore? What is used now? It also talks about 28 ga. sheet metal, spaced an inch off the wall. For aesthetic reasons, that's a no-go.

Here's what I'm planning: behind the stove, a wall framed with steel studs and covered with cement board and then stone veneer. This wall will also partially support a small mantel the wife wants. Will this be enough to reduce the clearance requirement to, say, 12-16 inches? If not, what else should I do? Some vents to promote airflow behind the cement board?

Please don't suggest asking the inspector. I've pulled a permit for the chimney, but none is required for the actual stove installation.
 
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Old 10-21-11, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by md2lgyk View Post
Installing a wood stove in my log home. I want to minimize the clearance from the combustible wall. The information I'm finding on the web talks about using asbestos millboard. Can you even buy that stuff anymore? What is used now? It also talks about 28 ga. sheet metal, spaced an inch off the wall. For aesthetic reasons, that's a no-go.

Here's what I'm planning: behind the stove, a wall framed with steel studs and covered with cement board and then stone veneer. This wall will also partially support a small mantel the wife wants. Will this be enough to reduce the clearance requirement to, say, 12-16 inches? If not, what else should I do? Some vents to promote airflow behind the cement board?

Please don't suggest asking the inspector. I've pulled a permit for the chimney, but none is required for the actual stove installation.

Equipment should be installed according to the manufacturer's installation instructions. If you don't want to do that, buy other equipment or don't install it.


That's really the only advice a reasonable and responsible person can give you.
 
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Old 10-22-11, 07:14 PM
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Thanks (not) for the singularly unhelpful reply. My question has nothing to do with "manufacturer's instructions." NFPA requirements have nothing to do with any particular manufacturer. Clearance requirements are clearance requirements, no matter whose stove it is.
 
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Old 10-22-11, 11:18 PM
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Actually, it's a singularly helpful reply. You just want to do what you want to do.
 
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Old 10-23-11, 01:42 AM
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Regardless of what the permit is for, in order for your house insurance to be valid you need to follow mfrs installation instructions.

And yes, the instructions will often either be the local code or even supersede it!
 
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Old 10-23-11, 04:18 AM
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Originally Posted by SeattlePioneer View Post
Actually, it's a singularly helpful reply. You just want to do what you want to do.
No, I don't "want to do what I want to do" unless it's safe. I am not some rank beginner - my wife and I built our house literally with our own hands and it passed every inspection without a problem. I'm merely asking for advice from somebody knowedgeable in this area because all the guidance I find references material (asbestos millboard) that is no longer available. Referring me to the stove manufacturer's instructions is not helpful. The stove is a very old one and there are no instructions.
 
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Old 10-23-11, 08:14 AM
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You ought to realize that no one can provide you with a safe way to engineer safe clearances to a stove about which they know nothing.

You are proposing to come up with your own design and standard. Fine ---but you have to take the responsibility if you do so.

If you don't want to do that, don't do it.
 
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Old 10-24-11, 07:33 AM
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Well, never mind. Should have known better than to expect engineering answers from a DIY site. I'll ask one of the engineers at work to do a thermal analysis for me.
 
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Old 10-24-11, 09:08 AM
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Be sure to give your engineer the same information you provided here, and let us know what kind of answer you receive.
 
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Old 10-29-11, 05:08 AM
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Originally Posted by SeattlePioneer View Post
Be sure to give your engineer the same information you provided here, and let us know what kind of answer you receive.
Well, after getting no useful help from anbody, I decided to talk to the inspector. Turns out a permit IS required for the stove installation. We went over what I plan to do, and he approved it. Actually, he said it is almost overkill.
 
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Old 10-29-11, 06:57 AM
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Thumbs up Your feed back is much appreciated.

You expressed some frustration in the answers you received here but your thread highlights some of the difficulties those who try to help also face.

As you stated we are not engineers nor do we claim to always be the final word.
We can only do our best to guide you in finding the answer to your specific question.

Next time it would be to your benefit to not tell us where the answer may or may not be found.


.
 
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Old 11-20-11, 07:09 AM
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I'm not an inspector but do a youtube search on reducing clearances to combustibles. Someone posted a very good "how to" with foil backed insulation, 2 layers of cement board and 1" spacing. Keep in mind, 18" clearance for single wall stove pipe, 6" for double wall and also keep in mind proper hearth building.
 
 

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