Problems Keeping Fire Going in Wood Burning Fireplace with Real Wood


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Old 01-14-12, 04:33 PM
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Problems Keeping Fire Going in Wood Burning Fireplace with Real Wood

Hey everyone:

What's the best way to keep a fire going using real wood? Last week, we tried to have a fire with real wood that we bought from the store which wasn't that expensive, but anytime we would start the fire, the paper in the fireplace would catch, but then go out within a few minutes. We put paper in, cardboard box pieces and added a piece of real wood in and it wouldn't stay lit. What can we do about this problem? We were told not to always use duraflame logs all the time according to our apartment's community manager.
 
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Old 01-14-12, 04:44 PM
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Paper alone will probably not get the logs hot enough to ignite. Graduate your flame from paper to small wood, like twigs or trim waste from a construction site, then to moderately sized pieces of split wood. Once it gets burning and a coal bed occurs, you can add larger wood to the rack. Source: Boy Scout 101
 
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Old 01-14-12, 04:48 PM
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One word: kindling. Of course Chandler was more descriptive. ;-)
 
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Old 01-14-12, 04:50 PM
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What are the best burning woods? The stuff we bought was claimed to have been kiln dried.
 
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Old 01-14-12, 05:35 PM
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Really dry wood will almost light with a match. Tricks are to elevate the wood so air and your starter efforts can burn from the bottom up. Wood must be split so the fire can get to the wood and not have to burn through a round log. After a fire is going, some round wood can be used, but if it doesn't burn well, it isn't dry. When adding new wood to an established fire, don't block the air flow.

My guess is that kiln dried wood isn't all that dry, so carefully cut off a piece of one of those duraflame logs and place your real wood above it. Not too much, I use a one inch slice, but a similar amount in whatever chunks you can cut off. Again, watch the fingers.

If you don't want to chunk up a duraflame, they make fire starters, just little logs of the same stuff.

If any of your wood is white birch with some bark you can salvage, it makes a great starter for the improvised starter.

It takes a little practice, but keeping the air flow under the logs is a key. When I prep my firewood I always save a bunch of the small short pieces so I can place one or two front to back to get my elevation. One is often enough, you just start the fire on one end. As your ask bed builds up you can just push some ashes to each side and that will hold the new logs up for the air flow.

Bud
 
 

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