Permanant chopping block failure?


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Old 10-25-12, 10:17 AM
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Permanant chopping block failure?

So, this is semi related to wood stoves and heating.

Every year we ask the guys who deliver our firewood to bring along a good size full chunk of tree for a chopping block. Every year they forget. Our old one is starting to fall apart.

We like to reuse stuff, so I came up with an idea for a chunk of chimney we had lying around. I moved it to the chopping area. This wasn't easy to do by myself. I cut a few chunks of 4X4" posts to really tightly jam into the square hole in the chimney. I cut some old 2X12" and screwed it into the 4X4. Then I cut some 2X4" to screw to the top to act as a semi border to hold wood in place when being chopped.

I do understand that every now and again I'll have to replace the upper surface with new wood as the surface gets too badly damaged.

Firewood really seems difficult to chop on this thing. I really seemed like a good idea, but I think the energy from the axe is being transferred through the wood and into my structure. Could this be because it's not a solid block? The wood almost seems to slightly bounce a bit when the axe hits it.

Not sure if I have the physics right. Any ideas? Anyhoo, here's a pic:
 
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Old 10-25-12, 10:24 AM
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So the concrete portion from the chimney is hollow, right? If so, I think the platform you have on top of it is bouncing down into that space and you're losing energy there.
 
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Old 10-25-12, 10:26 AM
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I think you are hitting the nail on the head...so to speak. A chunk of trunk is one homogeneous piece What you have is not. The 4x4s are flexing as is the wood on top.

Now....if you filled the chimney with solid concrete and then attached wood somehow to the top...it would probably be better.
 
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Old 10-25-12, 10:31 AM
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OK, now that I read more carefully, I see you did plug the hole.
 
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Old 10-25-12, 11:16 AM
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Bingo to all gentlemen. And thank you.

I took grade 13 physics twice to improve my mark from the first time. 62% went to 66%. I'm obviously not that good at the physics.

I took our old chopping block and flipped it over. Used it for a while and I am no longer questioning whether I'm getting old and feeble. Some old fashioned traditions shouldn't be fiddled with. The old one will get me through another year I guess.

Thinking about the idea of filling this thing with concrete is scary. It was back breaking to get it to where it is now and took a few hours by myself. Not doing that. Wayyyy too heavy.

I think I'm taking the sawzall to my creation and turning it into a planter after all. Great. Now I've got to move it again to a more aesthetically pleasing spot.

Ah well.
 
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Old 10-25-12, 11:28 AM
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What...you don't have one of those $25 dollys from Harbor Freight? Even a cheap one (make sure it has big tires) makes moving things like that much easier.
 
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Old 10-25-12, 12:54 PM
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I've got one from Canadian Tire that can hold up to 800lbs, but the thing is doing it yourself. You've got to tip the thing up enough to get the dolly under it. That's the first problem.

Then, tipping the dolly back without the thing angling off the dolly.... It was a very frustrating day. I needed another set of hands, but I'm incredibly stubborn about being able to do things myself, and having my wife maintain her current count of fingers.
 
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Old 10-25-12, 12:58 PM
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and having my wife maintain her current count of fingers
Ack! Yeah, a brother-in-law of mine lost the tip of his left index, middle and ring fingers helping a guy move some landscape blocks a couple of years ago, your concerns are valid.
 
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Old 10-25-12, 01:10 PM
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A ratchet tie down strap is my best friend sometimes. I've found I am more likely to get pinched doing things like this if I involve my better half or a neighbor. At least when it's just me, one hand knows what the other is doing.
 
 

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