Hello Everyone, new user and Fireplace / Woodstove Question


  #1  
Old 01-23-14, 11:04 AM
L
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Hello Everyone, new user and Fireplace / Woodstove Question

Hi,

I am new to the forum and am in the Boston MA area.

I am about to add a wood stove to my house and have the thru wall collar, chimney for outside the house etc. I will be building a brick hearth and brick walls surrounding the wood stove. It is an antique home and unfortunately the two wood stoves the house once had were removed long ago. The house is 1200 square feet with soon to be finished 500 square foot of space via attic loft.

1. It is the triple wall type that is meant to pass through the wall. Am I crazy in thinking I should still fabricate a wall patch / say a brick wall patch for the collar to pass through. Of what I understand the type I have is indeed meant to pass through the wall, wood, sheetrock etc. I forget the name brand right now, but when I got everything months ago I did confirm that is what it is for.

2. what are the 'minimum's distances that the wood stove should be from the side and rear wall as it will face such walls on two sides, the wood stove will be open on the front and other side faces the living room.

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 01-23-14, 11:49 AM
R
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The Mfg. should be able to provide the proper clearance needed you might check their website. I used DuraVent DuraPlus pipes that are stainless steel, triple wall insulated and have had zero problems. even with the proper clearance from the walls I still opted to put heat shields along the sides and back of the stove cause they do get HOT and the extra shields make for a more comfortable feeling in the safety department.
 
  #3  
Old 01-23-14, 12:14 PM
L
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Yeah I have one that is meant to go right through a wall, but likely I will build a brick patch for it to pass through, just to be extra safe
 
  #4  
Old 01-23-14, 01:04 PM
B
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I've only experienced one major chimney fire in a tile lined masonry chimney and it shook the entire house. We found some pieces of tile in the yard 30' from the house that were ejected during this event. Our neighbor watched from across the street and said there were 20' flames out the top. We had it professionally repaired and he said it actually help up rather well compared to some. Some he said end up with only a chimney standing.

Any extra precautions you can take, take them. I still burn wood, but far more cautiously.

While adding wood to the front of the stove (old Dover) the hot logs are exposed to an influx of fresh air and snaps and pops are common. One year we noticed a burn spot on the couch 15 feet away and no one can remember a snap or pop sending a hot ember across the room, but apparently it happened. The carpet in front of the concrete hearth accumulated its share of burns as well.

Knock on wood, the house is still standing and we are still enjoying our now air tight wood stove and plan on having something similar at our camp to be.

Tall (cold) outside chimneys are the most difficult to establish and maintain a draft and often provide an annoying flow of cold air when not in use.

Bud
 
 

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