Paint And Firebrick For Stove.


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Old 07-13-14, 07:28 PM
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Paint And Firebrick For Stove.

I'd like to ask two questions about a stove I've made: cheapest/best way to rustguard it and does it need/would it benefit from firebricks?

The stove is 18" long x 15" high and 14" wide. The actual firespace inside is 12" deep. The bottom 3" being grate and ashpan.

Whole thing made of mild steel plate

At the back is a 4" dia flue collar located 2" below the top.

It is intended to serve ideally as a slow smoker. It has had one practice run and didn't seem to catch fire real well. i.e the draught system wasn't as good as I thought it should be.

But I stacked it with wood and a shovel of half burned hot wood from the barbeque fire and left it. The following morning all the wood was gone. So it l ooks like it slowly combusted it just as we wished.

It leaks a little smoke. It is partly bolted together and partly welded - in order to allows dismantling.

So it is going to sit outside in the weather.

So that's it. The whole story.

I need waterproof paint or something on it. Didn't they use to us blacklead paint or something once? Wouldn't be able to get that now I suppose.

And I may need pointers on the firebrick thing. Maybe it'll all burn through too quickly as is? Maybe it's wasting heat? Maybe it's a really bad shape/design? Maybe the flue is in the wrong place? How should the chimney be - immediate riser or a long horizontal length before it rises is okay? That ashpan drawer - you can perhaps just make out the slide that uncovers air holes? Well maybe there's so much air leaks around the side of the thing that it needs no airholes.. I've no idea how airtight a stove ideally is for incoming air...

Any hints/wrinkles/criticisms will be welcome.

But mainly: Paint. Firebricks.

 
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Old 07-14-14, 03:34 AM
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I don't know too much about firebrick but for the outside finish you'd sand it down and apply stove paint. it only come in flat black. For colors you'd need to use an engine enamel [I don't know if it withstands heat as well as stove paint] An extra hot fire will burn off most any paint.
 
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Old 07-14-14, 10:46 AM
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I think adding firebrick is a no-brainer since the cost is only $3.00 - $4.00 a brick. Lay them flat in the bottom, and stand then upright on the sides and back. Angle iron works great for a top track to hold the standing ones in place. Just get the thickness of your brick and weld the angle iron about 1/2" higher than the height. Then when you need to replace one, just lift it up and pull out the bottom. If you weld the angle iron tight to the brick you will never be able to replace them.

You can get firebrick at any big box store or hearth retailer.
 
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Old 07-14-14, 06:30 PM
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Stove paint? Thank you. I didn't even know it existed.

Firebrick a no brainer? Why?

I mean apart from the economic facts. Is firebrick automatically what one should have in any firebox? Or any thin steel box? Or something like that?

Just noticed I failed to specify the 'steel plate'. Not 'plate' at all - just 2mm mild steel.

And do I put firebrick at the top or only bottom and sides?

I gave the dimensions because I wondered if it were too small for firebricks inside. I guess okay, eh?

Should have built it so's the front came off for changing firebricks. Top and sides come off right now. Front and back are heavy framed things everything else fastens to.

And the top. If no firebrick on top would you recommend I put something heavier up there than the present 2mm steel?
 
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Old 07-15-14, 03:48 AM
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All the wood stoves I've had only had the firebrick on the sides, but they all had grates at the bottom.
You'll probably have to go to a paint store to find the stove paint. I don't know if they sell it in quarts, I've always bought it in gallons. It's similar to BBQ black but has a higher heat rating.
 
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Old 07-16-14, 06:51 AM
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Firebrick is a no brainer because of the advantages firebrick serves. The first question you should be asking is why do manufacturers use firebrick in the first place?

Firebrick lined fireplace will heat more evenly and more efficiently than a non-lined firebox. Without the firebrick you will get hot spots that will cause the metal to break down much faster over time and could also lead to cracking of the metal, where as the firebrick will transfer the heat more evenly in the firebox.

The other benefit to a firebrick lined fireplace is it will hold heat longer. Meaning once the fire starts to die out the bricks will hold heat keeping the coal bed red longer. The biggest challenge most wood burners have on the market is the over night slow burn. Being able to load the fireplace at say 10pm and damper it down so you still have a fire at 7am the next morning. Many stoves you will be out of fire by morning, but you will still have an ember bed of coals that will ignite the wood when you reload it in the morning.

Lastly, the advantage to a firebrick lined stove is it will hold up to hotter fires without damaging the metal. Common mistake people do is think a stove is an incinerator where they can burn it as hot as they want and put anything in there. If you over fire it, the metal will warp, crack and damage very quickly. A firebrick lined stove will help prevent that and allow you to burn hotter fires without damaging the stove. You still can not burn anything in there, but it allows you a hotter fire compared to a non firebrick stove without damaging.

And yes, line the walls, and floor. You will get longer and better performance out of it.

Hope this helps out on benefits to firebrick. Good luck.
 
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Old 07-17-14, 12:37 AM
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Mine - you see the picture - is only a firebox for manufacturing smoke for a smokehouse really. It might double as a heater within the shed sometimes, might not.

Not sure what difference that makes to the overall picture, if anything.

It means the long burn is important, I guess. We'd like it to smoke away over night, for sure.

So firebricks retaining heat would be good for this I guess.

It has a grate and ash pan, 3" deep. Would you put firebrick under that ashpan?

Would you put firebrick on the top, above the fire?

When you say firebrick what sort size are you thinking? Like how thick are they? I haven't seen any yet. Like I remember some I've seen years ago. But what's on sale here and now I don't know. Asked at Bunnings the other day and they thought I meant burnable coal bricks.

And I read of someone who used Vermiculite because it was much cheaper. Then I googled vermiculite and found it expands greatly from heat. Don't know if it is really suitable.

Damaging the metal I'm thinking should be a major consideration for me. Because I've just used 2mm mild steel. Stoves and such are commonly thick cast iron aren't they? Or they used to be. I see lots of much thinner things nowadays in the BBQ section of the hardware store.

That's why I'm wondering about the top. Putting firebrick there somehow. Perhaps putting a piece of 3/16" steel up there? That's what I've got to hand.

Currently I'm staring at it wondering how I'm going to finalise it so's I can replace firebricks if they're in it...

What about cracks along the joins? Anyone know about the importance of draughts, airflow, in these things? Is it important to make sure there's none or it's not critical at all?
 
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Old 07-17-14, 04:15 AM
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I can only go by the stoves that I have owned - they only have firebrick on the 3 inside walls of the stove. My shop stove [an old morning glory] is round and has the brick all the way around and is fed from the top. There is no need for brick under the ash tray.

I'd be more concerned about smoke coming out of the stove [other than at the flue] than any air entering the stove. The stove needs to have some air enter it to facilitate burning.
 
 

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