Husband wants to tear down chimney


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Old 05-28-15, 02:57 PM
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Husband wants to tear down chimney

Surely there must be a less expensive way to fix this crack. Please help
 
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Old 05-28-15, 03:00 PM
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This photo is taken where the pipe goes into the chimney from the woodstove
 
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Old 05-28-15, 03:08 PM
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Welcome to the forums! Are we looking into the wall thimble, or from another vantage point? What is the cracked piece? Is there a metal liner in the chimney?
 
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Old 05-28-15, 03:32 PM
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I'm not so sure that crack is anything to be concerned about. It appears to be in a terra cotta flue liner. If you do want to do something then I would suggest taking an old metal file and grinding a sharp edge on the end. Carefully scrape off the creosote and soot until you get to red tile then try to enlarge the crack in a "backward" or "upside down" vee shape, with the widest point being the deepest part of the crack. Get some furnace cement (fireplace shop or some old-time hardware stores) and force it into the crack until it is full from bottom to top.

Now what DOES concern me is the condition of the outer part of the chimney. Please take a step back and shoot a picture of that and post it.
 
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Old 05-28-15, 03:57 PM
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Another photo

Another photo, will post another as well. I think the chimney is in fairly good shape
 
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Old 05-28-15, 04:00 PM
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No metal liner

I don't know what a thimble is, other than for sewing there is no metal liner
 
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Old 05-28-15, 04:05 PM
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Another photo

I thnk the crack inside appears to be just a surface crack, would like to do the least expensive fix (with safety in mind) we plan to switch to mini split heat pumps in the future
 
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Old 05-28-15, 04:17 PM
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A "thimble" is a fabricated piece of sheet metal, often with a collar, that inserts into the brick of the chimney. It is sized on the outside to fit the hole in the chimney and with an inside diameter to fit the smoke pipe of the stove or other appliance. It extends into the chimney past the bricks and into the liner, usually a terra cotta (baked clay) liner.

Your chimney doesn't look bad. I think a proper thimble would make it look better from the outside. The crack really doesn't look bad at all as no pieces have fallen out. Maybe just a wire brushing and a bit of scraping to clean it up and then just the smallest amount of furnace cement would be all it needs. From what I have seen there is no reason in the world to tear it down. Then again, I haven't seen the entire chimney.

You DO need a little "tuck pointing", filling in where the mortar has fallen out between bricks as well as scrubbing the soot from the bricks but that is mostly cosmetic. From the soot staining it is obvious that you didn't even have a proper thimble in this chimney. You can get one fabricated in most sheet metal shops and some fireplace shops. Cost would probably be around $100.
 

Last edited by Furd; 05-28-15 at 05:28 PM. Reason: Added second quotationmark.
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Old 05-29-15, 03:21 AM
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Thimbles are also made out of terracotta although the one you have appears to be made out of concrete or mortar.
 
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Old 06-02-15, 02:04 PM
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I don't think terracotta is used for flue liners - should be vitrified clay, which is fired to around 2000 deg F and is acid resistant, or metal. http://www.masonryconstruction.com/I...68-1375715.pdf
 
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Old 06-03-15, 04:14 PM
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P.S. Terracotta is what flower pots are made of and some indoor floor tile in Mexico. The clay is baked at a low temperature, and it is not impervious to moisture nor is acid resistant like vitrified clay pipe, which is fired at 2,000 deg F.
 
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Old 06-03-15, 05:22 PM
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I've heard the liners and thimbles called both clay and terracotta. I knew they weren't the same terracotta as pots and tiles but just assumed it was still in the same family. Don't recall having heard of vitrified clay before. Always nice to learn something new especially if you can get your brain to hold on to those new facts
 
 

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