Chimney height relative to trees


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Old 10-24-15, 08:59 AM
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Chimney height relative to trees

I have trouble getting a good draft in recent years (2) I have an 8 in. liner slipped down inside brick. Outlet is 40" above roof. Two story on a hill. However I have large Ash within 30-35 lateral feet, the tops being roughly 10' higher. No cap. Wind doesn't seem to be the problem, its when the air is heavy (moist) and still that seems to be the worst. Is it the trees? Can I add maybe 2 sections-(triple wall perhaps)to the top? I realize a bracing problem could present itself.
 
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Old 10-24-15, 09:47 AM
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Hi ranwilt and welcome to the forum.
Chimney draft is poorly understood and begins with the location of the appliance inside. Is this a wood stove, open fireplace, gas, or what are we dealing with.

I'll call it a wood stove for now. Is the wood stove located in the basement, first or second floor?
Is the chimney located on the outside of the home or enclosed up through heated house?

Bud

PS humid air is lighter than dry air , other factors being equal. That is one I missed if they ever taught it years ago.
 
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Old 10-25-15, 10:51 AM
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chimney height relative to trees

It is a jacketed stove in the bsmnt, about 30 ft of interior chimney I have learned already the biggest contributing factor to a robust draft is - duh - heat! If its 40 degrees I won't have a hot fire, I burn mostly oak, dry but perhaps a little 'young'. I'm going to focus a bit more on getting some elm (dead and dry) to stoke things up a bit. I have since been convinced the surrounding trees mean relatively little to draft issues. unfortunately i'll probably end up using the furnace a little
 
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Old 10-25-15, 12:44 PM
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The height difference and the temperature difference are directly related to the pressure difference. As long as it isn't competing for air from a limited source a basement is good.

If a basement has been air sealed to the outside and house above, its ability to supply make-up air can be an issue. Also, other exhaust functions, water heater, dryer, kitchen and bath fans. Whole house fans and huge kitchen fans should not be operated while the wood stove is in use.

Dry wood will improve burning and the draft. When times were tough and the wood pile was too low I would grab the chainsaw and drop a couple of trees. That was green and almost wouldn't burn.

If opening a window in the basement improves the draft, then you should consider a dedicated combustion air supply. The "open a window" fix is not a good solution as too often the window gets closed when the fire is dying out.

Make sure you have plenty of combustion air and no competing exhaust appliances.

Bud
 
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Old 10-25-15, 03:16 PM
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Instead of adding more height to the chimney you could add a draft inducer. I got one on ebay for like 80$. idk if your appliance allows you to use a barometric damper. If so you could try adding that as well.
 
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Old 10-25-15, 03:46 PM
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A barometric damper is intended to reduce and control the draft, not increase it.
I f by "jacketed stove" you mean it is used to heat water, that may also be slowing and limiting the warm up process.

Bud
 
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Old 10-28-15, 06:27 AM
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Thank you, I always assumed since its a 100 year old house I had plenty of (fresh) air supply. A dedicated supply source is worth trying
 
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Old 10-28-15, 06:37 AM
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Thanks - I didn't know there was such a thing as a draft inducer. The burner is really a glorified barrel stove, 4 ft deep, big door, squirrel cage fan pushing air thru a 2 or 3 in 'jacket' to feed into duct work, plus of course heat from the burner itself -(convection?) I've learned a lot thanks again to all
 
 

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