Majestic Vermont Castings Dv360 pilot light issue


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Old 10-25-15, 09:22 AM
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Majestic Vermont Castings Dv360 pilot light issue

Hi all, I'm having problems getting the pilot light on my gas Majestic Vermont Castings Dv360 fireplace to stay lit. I can get it to light when I press the lighting plunger, but it only will stay lit as long as I keep the pilot button pushed down. As soon as I release it, the flame dies. I've seen some posts about cleaning the thermopiles, but don't find anything about how. I also have seen some posts about voltage testing. Which should I do first?
Thanks
 
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Old 10-25-15, 07:05 PM
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Cleaning the thermopile is about like you'd expect. Clean it... A rag or old toothbrush can be used to wipe away any soot, dirt or anything else on it's surface that might be insulating it. You can also look to see if the pilot flame is properly adjusted and hitting the thermopile correctly. These things might work for a while but if your thermopile has some years on it it might be time to shop for a new one.
 
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Old 10-25-15, 09:34 PM
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Your problem is more likely a partially blocked or clogged pilot orifice.... especially if you're running on propane. Below is the manual for your fireplace. They illustrate what the pilot should like. It needs to fully engulf the pilot generator or enough voltage won't be produced.

The manual also lists the operating voltage of the pilot generator.

Another problem that I've found is that the pilot gas line could have an excessive amount of air in it. My fireplace take holding the pilot button in for several minutes for the pilot to be lit and stay lit.

Vermont Castings DV360 Operating Manual
 
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Old 11-09-15, 07:13 PM
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Hi again. It's been a while since I've been able to give this some attention. I cleaned the thermopiles with a wet rag and got some dirt off of them, but not much. They look clean. When I light the pilot, it appears that the flame is surrounding the thermopiles. In spite of that, the pilot still will not stay lit.
Should I use something different to clean the thermopiles, or is this a sure sign the thermopiles need to be replaced?
 
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Old 11-09-15, 08:20 PM
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The thermopile (pilot generator) sits in the flame so it will get dirty. Cleaning it will not afford much improvement. It's job is to convert heat into electricity to run the valve. The pilot flame needs to fully engulf the PG or it will not generate enough voltage.

In the manual I left you a link for.... the pilot flame is described. If it's not a full sized strong flame then the pilot orifice will need to be cleaned.
 
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Old 11-10-15, 03:30 PM
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Thanks PJMax for the quick reply. I had forgotten to mention in previous posts that I already had the manual and my unit runs on natural gas. I'm frustrated because the flame from my pilot looks exactly the same as the manual. The thermopile on each side of the pilot is engulfed about 3/8" as the manual suggests. The flame coming out the "front" of the pilot is very strong as well. Even so, I'm thinking that before I start buying and replacing parts, cleaning the orifice would be my first option.

Unless I'm missing it, the manual doesn't tell you how to clean the pilot. It just says to contact a qualified professional.
 
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Old 11-10-15, 03:34 PM
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Do you have a meter ?
You can measure the output of the pilot generator. That will tell you where you stand.
 
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Old 11-16-15, 03:57 PM
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Finally back at this again. My meter doesn't go low enough to measure MV. I just bought one that does. I'm assuming I should be measuring the voltage at the connectors at the control valve.
Another silly question. Where is the pilot orifice? I've removed the "hood" for the pilot and cleaned it. Is the orifice inside it? Or is it deeper in the tubing? The manual doesn't show it.
 

Last edited by beaverplt; 11-16-15 at 04:27 PM.
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Old 11-17-15, 05:22 PM
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I tested both Thermopiles. I'm getting over the minimum 325mv that the manual says they need. Because I can at least light the pilot with the piezo, I tested it using the flame from the pilot. Based on that it looks like the thermopiles are ok.
As I understand it, the Thermocouple is the copper tube going from the Honeywell control to the pilot orifice. How do you test voltage on that?
 
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Old 12-03-15, 06:36 PM
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Majestic Vermont Castings Dv360 Thermocouple location

Hi, I have a Majestic Vermont Castings DV360 where the pilot light will not stay lit. The troubleshooting I did found that it must be the thermocouple. I ordered one, received it today and went to install it. My problem is I cannot find a thermocouple anywhere in the unit to replace. I cannot find a diagram of the unit anywhere.
I've attached the drawings of my control valve and the pilot light tower in the fireplace. Any help will be greatly appreciatedName:  IMAG0275.jpg
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Old 12-03-15, 08:29 PM
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I try to keep a topic in a single thread.


I think you may be looking at the wrong picture.
Part 32 is the thermopile and part 30 is the thermocouple.

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Old 12-04-15, 12:51 PM
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It's the correct picture. My pilot looks nothing like the one you posted
 
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Old 12-04-15, 02:19 PM
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You have two parts that generate electrical voltage directly from the heat of the same pilot flame. The longer and fatter part sitting in the pilot flame is the pilot generator, and is where you would have measured the 325 millivolts. The pilot generator provides the voltage to turn on the main burner.

The smaller electrical generator is the thermocouple, and it provides the voltage to hold open a gas valve that provide gas to the pilot burner. If the pilot blows out, the voltage drops as the thermocouple cools and the valve allowing gas to flow to the pilot burner and main burners snaps shut, shutting off the gas for both.

The thermocouple generally produces about 30 milivolts, and the milivolts are best measured with an adaptor that allows the voltage to be measured when the magnet is in the circuit consuming power. It's unlikely that you have such an adaptor.

A dirty pilot burner and pilot orifice is the most common reason why the pilot wont stay lit. The pilot flame should look like a small blue blowtorch with a sharp flame that engulfs the tip of the thermocouple and pilot generator.

A dirty pilot has a soft blue flame, often with yellow tips and is easily blown around like a candle flame.

The pilot orifice is what usually gets dirty and will cause that soft pilot flame. To get to the pilot orifice, you have to remove the screws holding the pilot burner to the fireplace frame and gentle bend the pilot tubing out so you can work on it. Loosen the brass ferrule that holds the pilot tubing into the bottom of the pilot burner, and pull that ferrule away from the pilot burner. The pilot orifice will then USUALLY drop into you hand out the bottom of that hole.

Sometimes you can use the wire from a wire brush to clean the pilot orifice. Other pilot orifices have holes too small for that, and you'd need to blow them out with compressed air.

If you are ordering parts, I'd buy a replacement pilot orifice either to use now or in the future, since cleaning some pilot orifices can be difficult.

If you are replacing the thermocouple, I'd clean or replace the pilot orifice as well. Pilot orifices always get dirty eventually, so cleaning them when you already have the pilot burner out is a good practice.
 
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Old 12-04-15, 03:28 PM
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Thanks for the answers. Looking at my pilot, there are two identical thermopiles, one on each side of the pilot flame. Each one has two electrical leads that go down to the control valve. Besides those leads, the only thing that runs up to the pilot is the pilot tube. I've looked at every possible item in the fireplace and cannot find a thermocouple. I can't believe it operates without one, but I'll be darned if I can find it.
 
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Old 12-10-15, 03:49 PM
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Any Ideas?

Hi again, I'm getting extrememly frustrated with this fix. Is it possible this unit with the Honeywell valve does not have a thermocouple? I've never heard of a gas appliance without one. Maybe it's built in to the valve?
 
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Old 12-11-15, 12:23 PM
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Yes you have two pilot generators rather than a pilot generator and a thermocouple. The two pilot generators produce power to operate the remote control receiver which is located in the gas valve.

Sorry I didn't identify the type of valve you have earlier.
 
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Old 12-11-15, 04:58 PM
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Bad Valve.

Having checked all the possibilities, I've narrowed it down to the valve. Unfortunately, I've also found out that the valve is discontinued and no longer made. I'll have to see if I can find a used one somewhere. My other option is to replace all the parts from valve to pilot. Not sure if that's the path I want to take, but it beats replacing the whole unit.
 
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Old 12-14-15, 02:48 PM
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I'd say it's time to pay a GOOD repairman who specializes in repairing gas fireplaces to check out your appliance. You might find that cheap at the price. He's likely to be able to find a replacement for your valve if needed, and he might find some defect that is less costly to repair.

Sorry I wasn't much help with this. I retired from repairing gas fireplaces 8 1/2 years ago, and I didn't have much occasion to work on the valve and ignition system you have.
 
 

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