My Harman pellet stove is causing my circuit breaker to trip


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Old 03-04-18, 12:38 AM
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My Harman pellet stove is causing my circuit breaker to trip

Hello
I am trying to diagnose a problem with my Harman XXV stove.

My son couldn't get the stove to ignite the pellets in the normal fashion, he poured some rubbing alcohol into the burner pot. He says that after the the alcohol went "poof" the stove shut itself off.

The circuit breaker had flipped. I checked the stove's plug with my multimeter and the resistance was practically zero.

I am trying to diagnose the problem (my stove is off warranty) before I start ordering parts. Does this sound right?

1. The combustion fan failed.
2. The alcohol in the burner pot caused a short which fried the mother board.

So, I would order a mother board and a new combustion fan if I were confident that my hypothesis is correct.

I am hoping that someone can give me a sanity check before I dive into this. Help? Thanks.
 
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Old 03-04-18, 04:09 AM
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Welcome to the forums,.

What type of circuit breaker...... standard, GFI, AFCI (arc fault) ?
You need to check the plug from hot prong to neutral prong as well hot to ground and neutral to ground.

In the manual below the wiring diagram can be found on page 30. I would disconnect and check for shorts.... the inducer motor, the blower motor, and the feeder motor.

Manual... Hearth n home/installManuals/XXV.pdf
 
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Old 03-04-18, 04:24 AM
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Thanks for the advice Pete.

I’m not in the same location as the stove right now. I believe it to be a standard—it is the standard basement electric panel. However, I can’t rule out that it is a gfi.

I’ll try your advice when I get to the stove’s location. Am I correct that large resistance across any of the parts you mention indicates that part is failed? I’m not sure because if the coils have fried that would be a short, but if a connection has fried that would be disconnection. I’m just an amature.

Craig
 

Last edited by wcraigcarter; 03-04-18 at 04:25 AM. Reason: Misspelling
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Old 03-04-18, 08:55 AM
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A large resistance or open usually indicates an open circuit or coil.
The closer the resistance is to 0 ohms... the closer it is to a dead short.

You are tripping a breaker..... you are looking for a low resistance.... not an open.
 
 

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