Electric Fireplace--> 15 amp or 20 amp?


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Old 01-21-21, 05:14 PM
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Electric Fireplace--> 15 amp or 20 amp?

I just purchased a Modern Flames Landscape Pro Slim 56 inch electric fireplace.

The owners manual on the web says I need a 20 amp dedicated circuit. The one that came in the box says I need a 15 amp dedicated circuit.

Which one should I go with?

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-21-21, 05:23 PM
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That heater should use maximum power of 1500 watts or 12.5A at 120v.
It could operate off a 15A circuit but 20A would be more advisable.
 
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Old 02-17-21, 08:14 PM
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That heater should use maximum power of 1500 watts or 12.5A at 120v.
It could operate off a 15A circuit but 20A would be more advisable.
Can I ask why? My friend has an old (1960's) Sears Tri-heat the high setting is 1650W watts!
 
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Old 02-17-21, 08:24 PM
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Can you ask why.... about what ?

A heater is considered a continuous load and that would be 12A max on a 15A circuit.
A 1650w heater would draw 13.75A.
If you could find a 1650w heater today.... it would have a 20A plug on it.... by code.
 
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Old 02-17-21, 09:55 PM
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Can you ask why.... about what ?

A heater is considered a continuous load and that would be 12A max on a 15A circuit.
A 1650w heater would draw 13.75A.
If you could find a 1650w heater today.... it would have a 20A plug on it.... by code.

Yes why are new space heaters only rated for 1500W/12.5A

I had a co-worker ruined a good cord cap it was a NEMA 5-20P well he turned in onto a 5-15P yes he twisted it to make it fit in the 15A receptacle!

I have a few cheaper ones that use the same casing just the blades are different ways, I wonder what hold them in and if I can make the 15A one a 20A and vice versa?

The one my friend has was bought sometime in the mid 1960's it glows a very bright orange color when on high mode. I fixed it by oiling the fan motor and cleaning all of the dust and other crap out ready for another 50 + years and it likely will last that also can't say that about modern CRAP.

I had an 1875W hairdryer only about 1421W or as measured at 121VAC 11.74A so 454W off from it's "rating"

I used this for heat-shrink tubing before I knew what a heat-gun was heat-gun works much quicker but don't use if on your hair!
 
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Old 02-18-21, 01:30 AM
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I thought I explained it. Heaters are considered continuous use devices. By code.... you can only connect a continuous load up to 80% of the circuit ampacity. That would be 12A on a 15A circuit. A 1650w heater far exceeds that threshold. A 1500w heater is even slightly above it.
 
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