Fireplace backup batteries to light pilot with power out?

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Old 02-14-21, 04:23 PM
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Fireplace backup batteries to light pilot with power out?

We had an ice storm and we could not get the pilot lit as it is dependent on electric. Sure there are ways around that but I'd like to use technology to have the ability to get the pilot lit as opposed to taking the front cover off and lighting the pilot by hand. I don't have a generator yet but one is coming.

My fireplace system is essentially this one here:

https://www.kozyheat.com/wp-content/...ting_Guide.pdf

It looks like there is a way to have an external battery pack or something of the like added to the system which will allow the pilot to be lit when the power is out? I youtubed around a bit but didn't come to a conclusion.

I used a double mirror but all I found was the fan control box and the fireplace burner control.

Thank you.
 
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Old 02-15-21, 07:51 AM
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The bottom of page 5 shows where the batteries are to be installed in the receiver. Remove the cover plate (shown in the top photo) then open the battery compartment using the two clips next to the center switch. Insert 4 AA batteries with + and - as shown on battery compartment cover in the bottom photo.

Note information above the photos that says fans and light will not work on battery power.
 

Last edited by 2john02458; 02-15-21 at 07:55 AM. Reason: deleted inoperative photo link
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Old 02-15-21, 02:07 PM
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Thank you but I had already replaced those prior to this post. That doesn't control a battery backup for the pilot as far as I can tell.

Page 4 has a layout but I looked at the wiring harness and pins 1&3 of the DFBC were already occupied. It looks like I'd have to solder on two wires and a 4 battery case for this functionality which I am not sure I care enough to do because I am not sure that it would work.

Thoughts?
 
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Old 02-15-21, 02:27 PM
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Read page 10. It describes an electronic ignition sequence. The pilot light does not stay on when the fireplace is turned off. It will stay on when the fireplace is in use (by remote or possibly via a thermostat.)

See pilot assembly on page 6. When igniting via remote the ignitor will spark and the pilot flame lights. The flame sensor confirms that the pilot is lit and then controls the gas valve. If the temperature setting on the remote or a thermostat is satisfied, the gas valve will close but the pilot light will remain on. When the temperature drops the remote or thermostat will signal the gas valve to open. If you turn the fireplace off via remote or at the unit the gas valve closes and the pilot light goes off.

pins 1&3 of the DFBC were already occupied.
See the note at Figure 5.1 on page 20. I think that is the connection you are referring to. It is not used if you have a receiver and remote.
 
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Old 02-16-21, 03:15 PM
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Reading through.

Thanks.
 
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Old 02-16-21, 05:03 PM
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So the pilot light is always on, on this fireplace. Even if I switch it off at the wall. It could be that it was not set up correctly by whoever owned this house last but just thought that I'd mention the pilot light is always on.
 
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Old 02-16-21, 05:26 PM
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Interesting outcome

So after replacing the batteries in the receiver (which interestingly enough always took commands), I cutoff the main breaker to the house and the pilot stays lit.

I wonder if the batteries had just enough voltage to follow commands BUT could not supply enough current to keep the pilot lit (if that is also their function).

The Alkaline batteries only output about 1.3 VDC. I replaced with rechargeable batteries that only output 1.2 VDC.

Hmmmmmmm.
 
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Old 02-16-21, 10:34 PM
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That is not a standing pilot light. It's an intermittent ignition.
That is one of the most complicated systems I've seen in a gas fireplace and I'm sure the parts are very expensive.

Rechargeable batteries are typically 1.2v output.
It's hard to tell if the receiver batteries power the ignition module or you would need a second set.
 
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Old 02-17-21, 08:12 AM
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It's hard to tell if the receiver batteries power the ignition module or you would need a second set.
The manual states that the receiver batteries power the ignition.

So the pilot light is always on, on this fireplace. Even if I switch it off at the wall.
The switch is acting the same way a thermostat would operate. It controls the main valve. The pilot stays lit because it has not been turned OFF with the remote or unit switch.

As long as the pilot gas is flowing and the flame sensor is satisfied, the pilot will stay on. If the remote or unit switch is turned to OFF the pilot will go out and needs to be restarted via the ignition sequence. The battery is only needed to power the receiver (and receive remote commands) and to restart pilot if 120 volt power is off.
 
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Old 02-17-21, 02:10 PM
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The manual states that the receiver batteries power the ignition.
I hadn't seen that.
So that means the load will be fairly heavy on the batteries during a power failure.
 
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Old 02-17-21, 02:22 PM
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I hadn't seen that.
On page 4:
  • The DFC module:
  • Acts as the “brain” of the IPI system sending commands to specific areas
  • Powered by 120VAC through the Fan Control Module (FCM) via specific wiring harness

    using the receiver batteries for back up.

the load will be fairly heavy on the batteries during a power failure
Apparently only if the system is turned off and on again frequently. The pilot appears to remain on as long as the flame sensor is satisfied and the system is not turned OFF.
 
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Old 02-21-21, 07:18 PM
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In my case the pilot is always on even if I power it off manually from the receiving unit switch or remote. Either I am doing something wrong or it is wired incorrectly or the pilot is meant to stay on at all times.



 
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Old 02-22-21, 07:13 AM
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In my case the pilot is always on even if I power it off manually from the receiving unit switch or remote.
Maybe I misunderstood what I read in the manual. I was concentrating on the ignition sequence.

Since the pilot relies on the flame sensor to remain on, it will not drain down the batteries when normal power is not available.

A standing pilot should not be a problem. If it goes out the control will stop the gas until it is reignited by the ignition system.
 
 

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