Silicone to repair fireplace gas valve leak


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Old 01-12-24, 07:57 AM
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Silicone to repair fireplace gas valve leak

Hello All,

I have a basic gas fireplace with the typical pilot-light/gas valve set-up shown in the attached image. Fireplace working fine, flame looks great, but I wanted to check for any small gas leaks, so I bought a detector that signaled a small leak somewhere around the cylinder in the picture. So, I got some silicone and applied it as shown in the image. I'm pretty sure the leak is happening at the bottom of the black cylinder, but I applied the silicone liberally to cover my bases, top to bottom on that black cylinder to try to cover any area where gas may be leaking out.

Does anyone see any problem with doing this? I've not put any silicone on the actual gas/pilot valve to prevent any of it from working properly, only on the black cylinder as shown in the picture. The cylinder doesn't move at all, it doesn't twist or push up/down like the actual knobs that regular the gas flow, so I'm not impeding the function of the fireplace. It's a stationary cylinder and I basically just gummed up the bottom and sides of it where I think the gas leak may be occurring (but I won't know until start up the fireplace and retest for leaks).

I'll replace the entire gas valve assembly at some point, but wanted to see if this first stops the very small leak (only my most sensitive detector spots it, my other alarms don't go off, and as the fireplace heats up, the leak goes away, maybe due to a rubber seal expanding due to heat, I don't know).

Does anyone think that silicone could pose any kind of danger?

Thank you for any feedback you have.

Dan.





 

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01-12-24, 08:52 AM
Pilot Dane
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Gas leaks are NOT fixed by smearing caulk on the outside. If it is leaking replace the valve.
 
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Old 01-12-24, 08:52 AM
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Gas leaks are NOT fixed by smearing caulk on the outside. If it is leaking replace the valve.
 
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Old 01-12-24, 11:06 AM
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Okay, thank you, I will replace it. But there is no danger to just testing it out as it is with the caulking, right? Sealing off that bottom part of the valve assembly isn't causing any immediate danger is it if I start the fireplace? I don't know what the function is of that black cylinder, but I can't see that sealing the bottom of it could cause any problems.
 
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Old 01-12-24, 01:00 PM
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In the top picture is the solenoid. It's what opens the gas valve.
I have to tell you.... it is extremely rare to have a valve leak.
A leaky line is more common than a leaky valve.

If you are positive the gas smell is coming from the base of the solenoid.... then the problem would be a ripped diaphragm and cannot be externally sealed.
 
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Old 01-12-24, 03:58 PM
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Watch the news. A hotel recently had a major gas explosion. And, every few months there is a house exploding. Don't cut corners when working with gas. Things can go very badly. If you suspect a gas leak don't be a Darwin Award winner by testing some bush fix with caulk. If you are lucky there will be a fireball, whoomp sound, and you loose your eyebrows. Unlucky, and your house will be on the news blown apart like a cartoon.

Close the shutoff valve and fix it properly!
 
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Old 01-13-24, 10:16 AM
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need to fix it correctly besides an explosion hazard it can also cause suffocation much like carbon monoxide there's is a simple way to detect most leaks and that's just soapy water in a spray bottle and look for bubbles forming at the leak it may be able to get you a better idea where its leaking at as detectors may go off in a rather big area.
 
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