Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Framing, Flooring and Sub-Flooring
Reload this Page >

How should you go about replacing floor joists and bandin a semi-collapsing house?

How should you go about replacing floor joists and bandin a semi-collapsing house?


  #1  
Old 02-19-04, 04:45 PM
den29nbfe
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
How should you go about replacing floor joists and bandin a semi-collapsing house?

I have a corner of my home where a section of the band is rotted out from moisture and the ends of some of the floor joists. I plan on doing it myself because I'm kinda short on cash so that rules out paying someone. I know pretty much what has to be done but I just don't know where to start.
Someone please give me some advice.
 
  #2  
Old 02-19-04, 05:33 PM
imjerry
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Start ??

How about first using a temporary 2X4 Sill
(the board on top of the block foundation) behind the existing one
Then sister up all the existing joists in that area (double up) resting one end on the temp sill and the other on the center girder!! To do that lay them flat and roll them up into vertical position ,You will need a sledge hammer to get them vertical!!! The outer end should rest against the rotted band! When all of the joists are doubled open the outside wall and remove the rotted band and sill, slip a new sill under the ends of the new joists and replace the band!! A possibility when you open the wall you might find that the botton plate of the outside wall is also rotted, will have to be replaces too!

Few Tips: If the moisture still exists then the sills and band should be pressure treated (Wolmanized lumber)

Remove or not remove the old joists, Mmmm I think a good dosing with wood life will suffice and leave them there !!!

These are just how I would go about it, but not seeing the actual situation it is hard to acertain !! Jerry

You will need a sledge hammer to get some of the new sills in !

If the floor joists have sunk, you may have to jack them up with a hydraukic jack in order to get the sister joists in !!!
 
  #3  
Old 02-23-04, 08:16 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 344
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I recently sistered some joists. I was on my own, but am a good guesser.

I was lucky, there was no rim/header joist to contend with. I worked from the outside after removing the siding (doing a complete re-side anyway...).

I didn't insert them flat and rotate to vertical.

I used a bottle jack (or two) to raise the joist off the sill plate. I placed the jack on the old sill plate and lifted the subfloor/wall. Not much, just enough to allow insertion of new joist. 4 inch squares of 1/4 inch plate helped to distribute the load.

The floor most likely has sagged, you WILL need to jack up the adjacent joist in the middle of span.

I put a slight bevel on the bottom of the joist to make it a bit easier to insert on the opposite sill. A third bottle jack (under the new joist) wasn't needed, but it WOULD have come in handy.

Once you have it threaded in and started on the opposite sill, that's where the sledge comes in handy. Don't beat on the joist, use a scrap of material as a buffer. A really large wooden mallet or rubber hammer would be gentler on the joist.

You might be wondering about bowed joists while picking through the stack at the lumber yard. Hmmm.... I used (new) bowed lumber and considered it a way to compensate for the old sagging joists. Put the bow "up" to counteract the sagging. Oh, this technique will make it harder to insert the joists; pump that bottle jack in the middle of the span a few times.
 
  #4  
Old 02-23-04, 08:34 PM
imjerry
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Certainly

A fine way to attack that job, sounds like you did a fine job! Bottle jacks and raising the joists are the way to go. Personally I had no idea how far the floor had sagged, but rolling them in is sometimes the only way to go! I dont see one bit of bad advice in your post, maybe you can go give him a hand, just joking of course but the information you provided certainly should help!!!

You guys coulod be thousands of miles apart, I didnt look LOL

Good Luck to both of you !
 
  #5  
Old 02-23-04, 09:07 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 344
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Oh, one last thing:

If the joists are 2x8, you will have hard time finding bottle jacks that compress to 7 1/4 inches. I found the shortest ones I could (capacity is not an issue) and I still had to remove the screw adjuster.

To remove the adjuster will require a non-marring grip on the piston and a forceful un-screwing of the adjuster. On cheap bottle jacks (what else?) there is simply a dinged-up thread holding it.

I used 1/4 inch plate as backing, but 1/8 inch is easier to slip in place, and probably adequate.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: