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Framing door opening


digreg's Avatar
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03-20-04, 11:56 AM   #1  
digreg
Framing door opening

I am widening an existing doorway on a bearing wall. The current header is 4 feet wide and used 2x8 lumber.

I want to widen using a 6 foot header. Is 2x8 lumber with a 1/2 inch plywood sandwich of sufficient strength for this opening?

 
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SteveBausch's Avatar
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03-20-04, 04:45 PM   #2  
What is the wall supporting?


A roof at the very least, I suppose.

What else besides the roof, how about an attic used for storage?

How about an upper floor, how many upper floors?

Now, how wide are the rooms/roof sitting on the header?


Answer these, and we will attempt an answer.

 
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03-20-04, 05:57 PM   #3  
digreg
Two story house. 8 ft. ceilings. The interior bearing wall is 14 feet from the parallel exterior wall and 7 feet from the next parallel interior bearing wall.

I've been told that for a 6 ft. opening the MINIMUM is a doubled 2X8 framing lumber with 1/2 inch plywood sandwich. I was thinking of using 2x8 LVLs to be extra cautious.

 
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03-20-04, 07:38 PM   #4  
I am quoting from Code Check Building, 2nd printing, a spiral-wound 'flip book' you can buy (or browse) at your Home Depot, Lowes, etc.

This is exterior wall, correct? I used Table 10 on page 13.

Table 8 on page 9 applies to interior bearing walls.

"Roof, Ceiling & two center-bearing floors" with building width of 28 ft. shows a doubled 2x12 header capable of 5 ft 10 in., with two "jack studs" supporting each end of the header.


If we were to reverse-engineer the situation, assuming 2x8 was adequate, doubled 2x8s are shown as suitable for 4ft 2in. Doubled jack studs on each end.


It makes sense to me, and you can always find the book and see if I interpreted correctly.

How thick is this wall? 2x4, or 2x6? I am finding tripled 2x10s being quoted on interior headers spanning 6 foot.

 
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